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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'



 
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #1 (permalink) Mon Jul 10, 2006 12:17 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Synonym Search, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #108 "Synonyms for surrender", question 2

The island was so quiet, it looked like all living creatures had ......... it.

(a) quitted
(b) resigned
(c) deserted
(d) forgotten

Synonym Search, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #108 "Synonyms for surrender", answer 2

The island was so quiet, it looked like all living creatures had deserted it.

Correct answer: (c) deserted

Your answer was: incorrect
The island was so quiet, it looked like all living creatures had quitted it.
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Could you explain me why I can't use verb "to quit" instead of verb "to desert" in this sentence?

Jerry
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #2 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 7:43 am   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Hello,

The same question???

Thanks

Maddy
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #3 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:50 am   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

... had quit it' would just about be acceptable, but not the tense 'quitted'.
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #4 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:53 am   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

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Hi,

'Quit' has the sense of leave behind or go away from but is most associated with leaving with a certain amount of feeling as in: He was so angry with his employers that he quit his post as director the following day. 'Desert' again has the idea of leave behind but usually suggests you leave something and as a result you show that you no longer want to support someone or something as in: Thousands of people deserted the political party when the new leader took over. That is the sense expressed in the test sentence indicating that no one wanted to live there any longer. The word 'deserter' is used for someone who leaves the army without permission. The adjective 'deserted' describes a place that is empty where there is no one present as in: At midnight everyone is at home and the town square is deserted.

Alan
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #5 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:06 am   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

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Hi,

While I was slaving away with my answer, I see the ubiquitous Bev slipped a quick one in and having read it, I wonder what is behind this comment:....
Quote:
had quit it' would just about be acceptable, but not the tense 'quitted'.


Alan
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #6 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 13:26 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Dear Friends!
"After her husband's death, Marion was desperate and surrendered all hope for a better future". Explain me, please. Why the verb "surrender" has been chosen? In my opinion it will be better choosing the verb "lose".
"After her husband's death, Marion was desperate and lost all hope for a better future"
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #7 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 13:34 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

It's the writer's personal choice. Both verbs are fine.

'Surrendered' has more of an idea of Marion going through the action of giving up hope, whereas 'lost' carries the idea that it has simply gone.

"Explain to me..." not "explain me..."
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #8 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 15:11 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Dear Beeesneees!
Thanks! Explain to me, please, what does it mean "lay-buy".
Issa1
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #9 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 15:18 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Do you mean 'lay-by'?

http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/lay-by
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #10 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 17:10 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Beeesneees wrote:
... had quit it' would just about be acceptable, but not the tense 'quitted'.


Hello,

I don't follow you, isn't quitted the past participle of quit??? Please explain to me.

Maddy
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #11 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 18:42 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Hi Maddy,

My question, too but so far unanswered. 'Quitted' is an alternative for 'quit' in the past simple and past participle.

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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #12 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 22:57 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Maddy wrote:
Beeesneees wrote:
... had quit it' would just about be acceptable, but not the tense 'quitted'.


Hello,

I don't follow you, isn't quitted the past participle of quit??? Please explain to me.

Maddy


'Quit' has two past forms: both quit and quitted may be considered correct.
'had quitted it' simply sounds wrong in this context.
'had quite it' sounds slightly (though only slightly) more feasible.

http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-english-verb-quit.html
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #13 (permalink) Sat Nov 19, 2011 23:36 pm   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

I can't honestly see that feasibility has anything to do with it. The point is that 'quit' 'quitted' 'had quitted/had quit' is the wrong verb in that test sentence. And that's why I was at pains to explain the difference between 'quit' and 'desert' above.

Alan
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Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #14 (permalink) Sun Nov 27, 2011 7:50 am   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Beeesneees wrote:
Maddy wrote:
Beeesneees wrote:
... had quit it' would just about be acceptable, but not the tense 'quitted'.


Hello,

I don't follow you, isn't quitted the past participle of quit??? Please explain to me.

Maddy


'Quit' has two past forms: both quit and quitted may be considered correct.
'had quitted it' simply sounds wrong in this context.
'had quite it' sounds slightly (though only slightly) more feasible.

http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-english-verb-quit.html


thank you.
Maddy
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 08 Mar 2010
Posts: 109
Location: Italy

Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert' #15 (permalink) Sun Nov 27, 2011 7:52 am   Using the verb 'to quit' instead of verb the 'to desert'
 

Alan wrote:
I can't honestly see that feasibility has anything to do with it. The point is that 'quit' 'quitted' 'had quitted/had quit' is the wrong verb in that test sentence. And that's why I was at pains to explain the difference between 'quit' and 'desert' above.

Alan


Thank you for your answer.
Maddy
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 08 Mar 2010
Posts: 109
Location: Italy

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