Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
doubtful; dubious
formal
internal
suspect
proper
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Frightened vs. fearful


Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Meaning of 'doubled' | Difference between pieces and parts
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Frightened vs. fearful #1 (permalink) Thu Nov 04, 2004 7:37 am   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Test No. incompl/inter-3 "If you tend to forget", question 10

Sociologists maintain that some of the films on show today have created a generation of very ......... children.

(a) frightened
(b) afraid
(c) fearful
(d) frightening

Test No. incompl/inter-3 "If you tend to forget", answer 10

Sociologists maintain that some of the films on show today have created a generation of very frightened children.

Correct answer: (a) frightened

Your answer was: incorrect
Sociologists maintain that some of the films on show today have created a generation of very fearful children.
_________________________

Why word fearful doesn't fit in here?
thank you
Rudolf
Guest





Fearful vs. frightened #2 (permalink) Thu Nov 04, 2004 21:14 pm   Fearful vs. frightened
 

Fearful children are terrible children, that means they make other people afraid.
In the sentence you are referring to we are talking about children who are scared themselves - they are frightened.

TOEIC listening, talks: A mail voice message asks for confirmation of the receipt of a fax
Torsten
Learning Coach
Torsten Daerr

Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 17345
Location: EU

How do you use the English Prepositions correctly?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Have you read a good anecdote today? Subscribe to free email English course
Frightened vs Afraid #3 (permalink) Mon Jan 30, 2006 12:16 pm   Frightened vs Afraid
 

Hi,

Could you explain the difference between "frightened children" and "afraid children" ?

Why we can't use "afraid" if this example ?

Thank you
Yustas
Guest





Frightened/afraid #4 (permalink) Mon Jan 30, 2006 13:05 pm   Frightened/afraid
 

Hi Yustas,

In this sentence frightened children means that they are full of fear because they have seen films that have made them like this, Afraid is not usually used attributively as you have asked in your question - in other words you can't use it before a noun as you can with frightened (frightened children). You have to use in this way: The chidren are afraid of the films. (You use it predicatively).

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16531
Location: UK

Frightened vs. fearful #5 (permalink) Tue Jan 31, 2006 12:05 pm   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Thanks Alan

Now it's clear for me
Yustas
Guest





Frightened vs. fearful #6 (permalink) Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:53 am   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Hello

Could you explain the difference between "frightened children" and "frightening children" ?

Thanks a lot!
Blue3022000
New Member


Joined: 11 Apr 2009
Posts: 1
Location: Vietnam

Frightened vs. fearful #7 (permalink) Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:59 am   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Hi,

'Frightened children' are children who have seen/experienced something which has scared/frightened them. 'Frightening children' are children who make other people frightened.

Alan
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16531
Location: UK

Fearful vs. frightened #8 (permalink) Thu Jun 11, 2009 21:22 pm   Fearful vs. frightened
 

fearful...

I thought it was something like "full of fear"...

and NO! It isn't so... ohhhh :cry: sometimes I think "my God, I don't know English

and I thought I did"

and feel very SAD :cry:
Raperonzolo
New Member


Joined: 08 Jun 2009
Posts: 6

Fearful vs. frightened #9 (permalink) Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:55 am   Fearful vs. frightened
 

Raperonzolo, don't be sad. I've been exposed to my native language for decades, and I still don't understand most of it.

Kitos.
_________________
Keep it simple ... Keep it interesting.
Kitosdad
Language Coach


Joined: 04 Mar 2009
Posts: 13510
Location: ESSEN, Germany, (but English.)

Fearful vs. frightened #10 (permalink) Sat Oct 10, 2009 20:26 pm   Fearful vs. frightened
 

Hello Raperonzolo!
Don't worry about that!
According to Oxford dictionary fearful means ‘full of fear; frightened, apprehensive’
Consequently you were right!
Best wishes//
Danila88
New Member


Joined: 28 Aug 2009
Posts: 1

Frightened vs. fearful #11 (permalink) Thu Oct 15, 2009 12:20 pm   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Hi,

isn't "fearful" and "frightened" synonymous, but "frightened" stronger than "fearful"? I chose fearful because frightened seemed to strong of a word to me. Whenever I hear somebody say "fearful children" they say it in situations like going to the dentist, etc. To me, "fearful" is along the line with "suffering an anxiety"; "frightened" seems more like a shock reaction, like "scared" or "terrified". This is the first time I see "fearful" being used as a synonym for "terrible", but live and learn ...
Cgk
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 1715
Location: Franconia, Germany, Illinois, USA

Frightened vs. fearful #12 (permalink) Thu Oct 15, 2009 12:30 pm   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Please activate Javascript in your browser to listen to this audio recording

 64 Listened
Download mp3 Click to listen

Hi,

'Fearful' is an adjective that's gone downhill and has about the same value now as 'terrible' and 'awful'. These two words originally meant 'full of terror' and 'full of awe'. In some 19th century hymns there is use of the expression 'God's awful face', which meant the face of God was such that it filled you with a deep sense of fear and respect. Today you can quite happily say: You look awful this morning. What did you get up to last night?

We're on safer ground with 'frightened' that describes 'feeling afraid.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Passive Voice
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16531
Location: UK

Frightened vs. fearful #13 (permalink) Thu Oct 15, 2009 12:40 pm   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Is it like this in all of the English speaking countries, or is it a regional thing?
Cgk
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 10 Oct 2009
Posts: 1715
Location: Franconia, Germany, Illinois, USA

Frightened vs. fearful #14 (permalink) Sat Jun 05, 2010 16:35 pm   Frightened vs. fearful
 

I think this question is wrong because fearfull is still used both meaning frightened and frightenous.

Guatemala City residents (are) fearful after factory disappears into sinkhole
source

With just a simple googling i found out an excerpt of a similar text ,talking about children and television which says:
Quote:
Another concern is the amount of violence shown on television. Exposure to excessive or graphic violence may make children fearful and anxious.

http://www.brainy-child.com/article/tv-child.shtml

You gotta admit your mistake. I answered "fearful" and it's correct.
BenDover23
You can meet me at english-test.net


Joined: 05 Apr 2010
Posts: 82

Frightened vs. fearful #15 (permalink) Sat Jun 05, 2010 18:38 pm   Frightened vs. fearful
 

Fearful is incorrect for the reasons that have been provided. There is not an entire generation of fearful children. Some children may become fearful, but not all children.
_________________
"Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened."
Terry Pratchett
Beeesneees
Language Coach


Joined: 08 Apr 2010
Posts: 33122
Location: UK, born and bred

Display posts from previous:   
Meaning of 'doubled' | Difference between pieces and parts
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3
Latest topics on English Forums
Photojournalism is a branch of journalism that chiefly presents newsworthy...critics often say that it was a flop at the box officePhotojournalism is a branch of journalismСайты "П&#10Сайты "П&#10Сайты "П&#10Сайты "П&#10An editorial is an opinion column that states the opinion of the editorMeaning of "early departure"?Expression: keeping up with the Joneseschanged vs. modifiedAdvantage vs. profitWhat is exhausted?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail