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I hear vs. I am hearing


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I see her every day (present simple) | Meaning of 'no problem'
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I hear vs. I am hearing #16 (permalink) Fri Feb 20, 2009 15:03 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

Dear Sir
I hear what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit.

I am hearing what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit.

please give me differance of between two

regards
sajjad paha
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I hear vs. I am hearing #17 (permalink) Wed Mar 04, 2009 18:16 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

hi,
why
I hear what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit
but not
I was hearing what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit
thanks
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Listen/hear #18 (permalink) Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:49 am   Listen/hear
 

"I listen to what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit."

the object is "what you are saying"

-cmiiw-
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I hear vs. I am hearing #19 (permalink) Sun Apr 19, 2009 6:17 am   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

I just want to know: we NEVER use hear in continuous tense?
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I hear vs. I am hearing #20 (permalink) Sun Apr 19, 2009 6:53 am   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

Hi Senhorita,

It is possible to say 'I am hearing' in a different context from the first meaning of 'hear'. You could say: I can't believe the stories I am hearing about you. This means: I can't believe what people are telling me about you. 'Hear' in this sense means 'receive/get information'. Again in a news report a radio station newsreader could say: We are hearing reports about an earthquake in the south of the country.

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Listen #21 (permalink) Thu Sep 03, 2009 13:03 pm   Listen
 

Alan wrote:
You use it without to when there is no object


can you give me some example.thanks in advance
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I hear vs. I am hearing #22 (permalink) Thu Sep 03, 2009 13:12 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

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Hi,

If you want to say that you are attentive and paying attention, you can use 'listen' without an object and no preposition 'to'.

Look at this:

A: Please don't interrupt while I'm talking and don't suppose you hear a word I said.

B: Yes I did, I was listening.

The comment made by 'B' could also be: Yes I did I was listening to every word you said.

Alan
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I hear vs. I am hearing #23 (permalink) Thu Sep 03, 2009 13:14 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

i got it...thanks a lot
Anu_Riya
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I hear vs. I am hearing #24 (permalink) Sun Dec 13, 2009 16:06 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

thank for explain
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Listen/hear #25 (permalink) Sun Dec 13, 2009 16:20 pm   Listen/hear
 

Naive_User wrote:
Hi Alan,
I have a doubt,according to your statement "listen to" must be used with a object and I would like to know which is the object in the below sentence.
"I listen to what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit."


The object is "what you are saying".
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I hear vs. I am hearing #26 (permalink) Sat Feb 20, 2010 15:01 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

dear Sir
why the answer is '' am hearing '' not '' hear ''?

thanks
Farid Badr
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I hear vs. I am hearing #27 (permalink) Sat Feb 20, 2010 16:46 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

It's not that 'am hearing' is wrong, it's just unnecessary.

The progressive is an aspect. Aspects deal with the nature of information given. There are two types of aspect, durational and non-durational aspects. A durational aspect uses a structure to express duration. In English, the progressive does this.

Verbs themselves also have a time nature as part of their meaning. Some verbs naturally have duration (meaning they occur over a span of time rather than just in an instant). This characteristic is called aktionsart.

Because the aktionsart of 'hear' is already durational, the progressive aspect (which is used to make a non-durational verb durational) is not needed.

Technically 'I hear what you are saying' and 'I am hearing what you are saying' have the same meaning.

But saying 'I am hearing' is like saying 'that red firetruck is red'. The use of the progressive form of an already durational verb has no additional impact.
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I hear vs. I am hearing #28 (permalink) Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:44 am   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

Hi,

Just to jump in here I would add that 'I am hearing' while flouting this 'durational aspect' idea has an idiomatic use. It suggests that stories about something/someone are being talked about. Take this example: I am hearing rumours that you and Kate are going to get married.

Alan
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I hear vs. I am hearing #29 (permalink) Sun Apr 04, 2010 20:00 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

Thx a lot for explaning why we should use 'hear' not 'am hearing'.
I want to ask you that same is the case with 'I listen to what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit.'
and 'I am listening to what you are saying but that still doesn't make me want to change my mind one little bit.'(we should use 'listen to' not 'am listening to ').
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I hear vs. I am hearing #30 (permalink) Sun Apr 04, 2010 20:10 pm   I hear vs. I am hearing
 

No. I think both listen and listening to are correct as listen is different from hear.
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