Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
at or constituting a place where two surfaces meet
appropriate
edge
negotiable
idle
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

About tenses: finish vs. have finished


Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
no problem + to infinitive? | Books accompanied by the relevant questionnaires
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
About tenses: finish vs. have finished #16 (permalink) Thu Jul 20, 2006 18:15 pm   About tenses: finish vs. have finished
 

Yankee wrote:
Hi Cooliegirly,

Oops, I should have written that I agreed with everything you wrote about using 'after and when'. The thing I didn't agree with you about was the 'when + have had' combination.

Your feeling about the usage of when is right and that's why you would need the present perfect in the 3rd sentence.

Amy
I see. Well, I was just not sure if it was grammartically correct to use both "have had" and "will" in one sentence.
Cooliegirly
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 24 Jul 2005
Posts: 263

About tenses: finish vs. have finished #17 (permalink) Thu Jul 20, 2006 21:18 pm   About tenses: finish vs. have finished
 

FangFang wrote:
Hiii, Yankee:
I say that because i read some notes as follows(from an english grammar book)
"some adv ,like directly and immediately can be taken as a conjuction ____as soon as:
Immediately he arrived , he started telling us what to do."
But i think you are right , specially when you emphasize the meaning/nature of the verbs . :D


Hi Cooligirly

I would never use directly or immediately as conjunctions. (American English)

I've checked various dictionaries and it seems this may be a British usage. For input as to how often these two words are actually used as conjunctions in Britain, we'll have to get Alan's input.

Regarding different verb tenses in one sentence, that is not really unusual:

Past perfect + simple past:
"They had already left when he arrived."

Present perfect continuous + simple past:
"I have been living in the same town since I was born."

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Want to learn about the future tenses? Read this story and smileEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Start exploring the English language today! Subscribe to free email English course
About tenses: finish vs. have finished #18 (permalink) Fri Jul 21, 2006 12:28 pm   About tenses: finish vs. have finished
 

Hi, Yankee:
Are you sure it is Britain english? That won't be a big problem, right?
By the way, yesterday i talked it with my english friend ,i said:
" I wil return the book to you as soon as i finish it"
"Ok"
"I will return the book to you as soon as i've finished it"
"All right, oHHH, my god !you still keep my book?" :D
Of course, it is a joke. But both of them are ok. Now i am wondering where the differences between British english and American english ? :roll: :roll: :wink:
FangFang
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 18 May 2006
Posts: 369

Directly #19 (permalink) Fri Jul 21, 2006 12:45 pm   Directly
 

Hi FangFang,

Directly has now become respectable. In the Oxford Dictionary (1884-1926) it was considered colloquial as a conjunction. New Oxford (1998) registers it without a restriction. Webster's Third (1986) named it 'chiefly British' but Mirriam-Webster (2000) notes it without any regional restriction.

So

I came directly I heard the news is all right now both sides of the Atlantic.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16388
Location: UK

About tenses: finish vs. have finished #20 (permalink) Fri Jul 21, 2006 12:52 pm   About tenses: finish vs. have finished
 

Hi FangFang(what a long name :D ),
Quote:
"I will return the book to you as soon as i've finished it"
"All right, oHHH, my god !you still keep my book?"


You have no need to use Present Perfect as finish already has the meaning of completion :D
Pamela
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 1269
Location: RF

Directly #21 (permalink) Fri Jul 21, 2006 13:10 pm   Directly
 

Alan wrote:
Webster's Third (1986) named it 'chiefly British' but Mirriam-Webster (2000) notes it without any regional restriction.

So

I came directly I heard the news is all right now both sides of the Atlantic.


Hi Alan

If that's true, it sounds to me as though Websters must have been either brainwashed or run out of ink for the "chiefly British" notation in 2000. Maybe the Y2K bug caused a malfunction. :lol:

I'm still not convinced it can or should be called "all right now both sides of the Atlantic". I would rather give that sort of "general OK" to something that's actually in general and/or regular use.
My opinion is that using directly and immediately as conjunctions would still be considered an error (or omission) by 99% of Americans (possibly even more :lol:).

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

About tenses: finish vs. have finished #22 (permalink) Fri Jul 21, 2006 13:59 pm   About tenses: finish vs. have finished
 

Yankee wrote:
I prefer:
A) I 'll return the book to you as soon as I finish it.

I think it depends a bit on the nature/meaning of the verb used. I think I'd be much more likely to go for the present perfect using, for example, the verb "read":

I'll return the book to you as soon as I've read it.


FangFang wrote:
By the way, yesterday i talked it with my english friend ,i said:
" I wil return the book to you as soon as i finish it"
"Ok"
"I will return the book to you as soon as i've finished it"
"All right, oHHH, my god !you still keep my book?"

Of course, it is a joke. But both of them are ok. Now i am wondering where the differences between British english and American english ?


Hi FangFang

As I understand your last post, you have a British friend and he/she says both finish and have finished are possible after as soon as.

Now, it seems to me I've also indicated that both are possible. (See above! 8)) I gave you my preference for your "book" sentence along with an example of when I thought I'd be more likely to entertain thoughts of present perfect usage. :lol:

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

About tenses: finish vs. have finished #23 (permalink) Fri Jul 21, 2006 14:02 pm   About tenses: finish vs. have finished
 

Hiiiii, Pamela
You can call me "Fang" not "fang" :D :D
Yankee, i am confused now and i will go to check more information about this "informal " expressions.
When you are in a smaller circle what you know is limited within it ; When you enlarge that circle you will find more unknown.
FangFang
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 18 May 2006
Posts: 369

About tenses: finish vs. have finished #24 (permalink) Mon Nov 02, 2009 17:04 pm   About tenses: finish vs. have finished
 

Hi,
Reading the discussion above, I realized that I'm in real danger of getting my wits boiled (I hope they aren't boiled yet :) ).
So, please explain me in common words the difference in the meaning between the following phrases:

"He'll finish his dinner in 5 minutes" and "He'll have finished his dinner in 5 minutes"?
Are both of them correct? Thks.
_________________
Help me to improve my English, please. You'll get better company then ;-)
Fedorov
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 10 Jun 2009
Posts: 134

Display posts from previous:   
no problem + to infinitive? | Books accompanied by the relevant questionnaires
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
"world affairs section" vs "business section"Phrasal verb with "turn "Usage of the words: those and these and themwords can and couldHi Alen, could you correct this text for me?By Walk or By Walking on foot by footUnify/Unification or something else?Meaning of "capped to"What is the negative of have?His passion is...Verb questionscustoms exemptionverbs used with: test and exam

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail