Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
inhabitant; one who lives in a particular location
resident
embrace
remit
gate
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Straight from the horse's mouth?



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
I will send you a copy | take a shower
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Straight from the horse's mouth? #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 15, 2004 14:21 pm   Straight from the horse's mouth?
 

Test No. incompl/inter-25 "Wrapped round her finger", question 9

Are you sure your new boss isn't married? - Yes, honestly, I have it straight from the horse's ..........

(a) back
(b) mouth
(c) foot
(d) nose

Test No. incompl/inter-25 "Wrapped round her finger", answer 9

Are you sure your new boss isn't married? - Yes, honestly, I have it straight from the horse's mouth.

Correct answer: (b) mouth

Your answer was: correct
_________________________

hi! What does it mean
horses mouth
kentavr
Guest





Directly from the person #2 (permalink) Mon Nov 15, 2004 19:17 pm   Directly from the person
 

It means directly from the person or place where something began/directly from the source of origin.

TOEIC listening, talks: A city council announces school closures
Torsten
Learning Coach
Torsten Daerr

Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 17345
Location: EU

What do you know about the progressive forms?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Have you read a good anecdote today? Subscribe to free email English course
Straight from the horse's mouth? #3 (permalink) Wed Apr 27, 2011 10:22 am   Straight from the horse's mouth?
 

Hello,

The test sentence of this Question 9, I believe, is "Yes, honestly, I heard it straight from the horse's mouth" rather than
"Yes, honestly, I have it straight from the horse's mouth".

According to Cambridge Dictionaries Online's definition of this idiom, it says that if you hear something straight from the horse's mouth, you hear it from the person who has direct personal knowledge of the matter (http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/straight-from-the-horse-s-mouth#straight-from-the-horse-s-mouth__1).

Thus, the test sentence of this Question 9 should read "Yes, honestly, I heard it straight from the horse's mouth" rather than
"Yes, honestly, I have it straight from the horse's mouth". Could you please look into this matter?

Thank you.

Best wishes,
Bhikkhu1991a.
Bhikkhu1991a
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 04 Jan 2009
Posts: 441

Straight from the horse's mouth? #4 (permalink) Wed Apr 27, 2011 10:48 am   Straight from the horse's mouth?
 

Both versions are acceptable, Bhikku.
In referring to information which comes directly from the source, the idiomatic part is '(straight) from the horse's mouth' and not necessarily the preceding verb. 'It comes...' is also in typical use.

I have it straight from the horse's mouth. I have it from the highest authority (that is where the information comes from).
I heard it straight from the horse's mouth. I heard it from the highest authority (that is where I heard the information).
It comes straight from the horse's mouth. It comes from the highest authority (that is where the information comes from).
This is straight from the horse's mouth. This is from the highest authority (this is the source of the information).
_________________
"Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened."
Terry Pratchett
Beeesneees
Language Coach


Joined: 08 Apr 2010
Posts: 33208
Location: UK, born and bred

Straight from the horse's mouth? #5 (permalink) Fri Apr 29, 2011 11:14 am   Straight from the horse's mouth?
 

Hello Beeesneees,

Thank you for pointing out my mistake and broadening my horizons. As a result, I am learning from my mistake and am learning not to trust only one dictionary. Obviously, relying on only one dictionary leads me nowhere.

Thank you.

Best wishes,
Bhikkhu1991a.
Bhikkhu1991a
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 04 Jan 2009
Posts: 441

Display posts from previous:   
I will send you a copy | take a shower
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
all-you-can-eatreschedule your appointmentMeaning of Graphics test........... please help mecoughing spellsno problemonly 11 chaptersWhat is dowry?TOEFLŪ iBTYou whistle with your lips...bobbing for apples.my number is 555-1211My shift ends at about 5:30 pm.What does furnished mean?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail