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Mini Dialogue



 
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Mini Dialogue #1 (permalink) Sun Jul 29, 2012 4:32 am   Mini Dialogue
 

Hello,
Is writing a dialogue the same as writing a paragraph?

Take this example.

Write a mini-dialogue or a short conversation that is possible to occur at a proper place.
You choose ONE of the following topics:-

- Human Rights.

What if I start my dialogue with this greeting.

John: Hello, Mike, how are you?
Mike: Hello, John, I'm fine thanks, and you?
John: I'm fine too, what do you know about human rights?
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Mini Dialogue #2 (permalink) Sun Jul 29, 2012 7:29 am   Mini Dialogue
 

A dialogue and conversation are the same thing, so that format looks okay to me.
I suspect your content would be 'off' if you follow the prompt 'possible to occur at a specific place'. I think the examiner probably means something like a conversation at an airport, a bus station, a sports centre, a bus rink, in a shop, etc. (possibly a dialogue possibly between a member of staff and a customer or between two business people, for example, at the office. It might also be at a party or at a barbecue, etc, which would lend itself more to your starter, except that suddenly hurling yourself into a human right debate would be a very strange thing to do at such an event.
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Mini Dialogue #3 (permalink) Sun Jul 29, 2012 18:08 pm   Mini Dialogue
 

I really can't tell why in our university here in Egypt the professionals are like this, they always have strange questions in their exams!

A dialogue truly should be about a conversation:

- At the supermarket, between the cashier and the customer or between two customers discussing about what they are going to buy.

- At a bank, money exchange, job manager room, etc...
- At school, between a teacher and a student.

But human rights, looks like he wants a paragraph instead, that's too odd :(
He didn't even state with who and where exactly the dialogue will run.

But now I am asking, can I start with: Hello, how are you? and the answer of that in any dialogue?
Can this work Beeesneees?
BlackCitadel
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Mini Dialogue #4 (permalink) Sun Jul 29, 2012 22:31 pm   Mini Dialogue
 

If he wants a paragraph, then I would not expect the same format. I would expect it to be written like a story, rather than a script.You can start most conversations with 'hello, how are you?' if you wish. It may sound very formal and stilted in some situations.
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Mini Dialogue #5 (permalink) Mon Jul 30, 2012 1:10 am   Mini Dialogue
 

What does "human rights" exactly mean Beeesneees?
Can I talk about for an example, a teacher has the rights to teach students at school.
- A doctor has the rights to cure patients at hospitals.
- A wife has the rights towards her husband, one of which preparing him lunch. She also has rights towards her children, one of which looking after them.
BlackCitadel
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Posts: 882
Location: Egypt, Cairo

Mini Dialogue #6 (permalink) Mon Jul 30, 2012 6:17 am   Mini Dialogue
 

I wouldn't consider that to be a topic about human rights.
Human rights are basic rights and freedoms which everyone should expect.
To use those as examples, I think you would need to turn those on their head at the very least:
The students have a right to be taught well.
The patients have a right to expect a certain amount of care.
The children have a right to be looked after by their parents.

I suggest you read up about human rights if you intend writing about them.
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/human-rights/
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