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I wish you good day


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ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
11p.m. on a Freefall Friday | Identifying syllables
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I wish you good day #1 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 8:34 am   I wish you good day
 

Hi

I wish you good day,...

I’ve read it in a novel – literally, without any other punctuation marks and without article.

BNC:
Quote:
Your query was
wish you good day
Only 2 solutions found for this query
OK.

Does in this case 'good day' have a some more abstract meaning (like ‘wish you good luck’, for example) than when we say it traditionally – a good day
?
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I wish you good day #2 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 8:38 am   I wish you good day
 

Hi Tamara

With no additional context, I'd interpret I wish you good day as somone saying "Goodbye".

Amy
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Good day #3 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 10:45 am   Good day
 

Hi Tamara,

In my book this is rather formal and oldfashioned. It lays itself open to two interptretaions, I would say.

It could be a final salutation - I'm off, I'm going, ta ta, cheerio, see you

It could also be a final salutation with a sting in the tail. It reminds me of an occasion of a deal I did or rather didn't do with a car salesman. He had agreed certain points and when it came to the handing over of my car and the taking over of his car, he reneged on one major point. I then somewhat dramatically tore up the contract and walked out of the showroom with those words: I wish you good day. I didn't half feel good.

Alan
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I wish you a good day #4 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 10:55 am   I wish you a good day
 

Does adding an a change the meaning of the phrase? I mean what about I wish you a good day?

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Good day #5 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 11:38 am   Good day
 

Hi Torsten,

The addition of 'a' rather changes the meaning or puts it into another category. It suggests a good day of something like fishing, walking or whatever. The omission of the 'a' keeps it formal.

Alan
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Just you and English… #6 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:00 pm   Just you and English…
 

Hi Alan

Thanks a lot, indeed.
Great!

P.S. Correct use of articles is one my weakest points :) … :(
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Articles #7 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 13:17 pm   Articles
 

Hi Tamara,

Can I interest you in my material on the site on this topic?

ESL Lesson: Articles in English: The vs. A/an

http://www.english-test.net/lessons/16/index.html

Alan
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I wish you good day #8 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 20:32 pm   I wish you good day
 

Hello Alan

I do not know about Tamara but it did interest me! :lol:

Alan wrote:
Before a singular noun which is countable when it is mentioned for the first time and represents no particular person or thing.

«A horse is a noble animal>>


My question is:

What is the difference between:

1- The horse is a noble animal.
2- A horse is a noble animal.

Tom
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Articles #9 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 21:24 pm   Articles
 

Hi Tom,

I think this has been mentioned a few times before. Both obviously mean the same but the use of the definite article in The horse... tends in a way to glorify the horse, add extra dignity, put it at the top of the list as it were.

Alan
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Articles #10 (permalink) Fri Sep 01, 2006 21:40 pm   Articles
 

Thank you, Alan, for the link. I’ll take it.

Unfortunately, it’s not only a point of 'knowing rules'.
Use of articles is not natural for me (with my Slavic background). When I am highly attentive and specially concentrated on language constructions I use (rather than on the topic of conversation) – for example, when doing tests - I can do that at an… acceptable level.
But when I really work by using English – I still make lots of such mistakes…

(But, as the topic demonstrates – quite often any article is much better than nothing :) )
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Article #11 (permalink) Sat Sep 02, 2006 8:46 am   Article
 

Hi Tamara,

Funny you should mention about what they call zero article. Apparently it is becoming quite common in spoken English for the article to be dropped especially when the noun is qualified. You can hear people say: Oh yes, we had very nice holiday in Spain this year.

Listen out next time you hear people talking or being interviewed on the radio/tv.

Alan
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Article #12 (permalink) Sat Sep 02, 2006 9:18 am   Article
 

Alan wrote:
Apparently it is becoming quite common in spoken English for the article to be dropped especially when the noun is qualified. You can hear people say: Oh yes, we had very nice holiday in Spain this year.
:shock:

Alan, are you suggesting that it's becoming common in the UK to even say something such as "Oh, yes, we have very nice chair in the livingroom." ? :shock:

Amy
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Article #13 (permalink) Sat Sep 02, 2006 9:21 am   Article
 

Yes Amy, it is. We're clearly going to the dogs. It's terrible thing.

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I wish you good day #14 (permalink) Sat Sep 02, 2006 11:46 am   I wish you good day
 

Quote:
Yes Amy, it is. We're clearly going to the dogs. It's terrible thing.
:lol: :shock: :o

Tom
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? #15 (permalink) Sat Sep 02, 2006 11:51 am   ?
 

Hi Tom,

What do you want to say?

Alan
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