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Use of good morning/afternoon/evening



 
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ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Use of until: Until I had learnt Italian, I didn't go to... | Opposite of "punctual"
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Use of good morning/afternoon/evening #1 (permalink) Tue Sep 05, 2006 3:35 am   Use of good morning/afternoon/evening
 

Hi teachers,

We use good morning/afternoon/evening for greeting each other. But according to Michael Swan, we can also use them for leaving each other.

My question is " Does native speaker use them for leaving each other?"

Thanks in advance

Jupiter
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Use of good morning/afternoon/evening #2 (permalink) Tue Sep 05, 2006 5:15 am   Use of good morning/afternoon/evening
 

.
Personally, I'd only use "Good day" and "Good night" when leaving someone.

I use good morning/afternoon/evening exclusively as greetings.

Amy
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Use of good morning/afternoon/evening #3 (permalink) Tue Sep 05, 2006 14:24 pm   Use of good morning/afternoon/evening
 

I only use, "Good morning," to greet people who I know have just gotten out of bed, so I would not use it when I first see people at work or school, because I assume they have been out of bed for some time. Maybe I would say, "Good morning," to someone at work or school if I see that his hair is still wet from the shower, or if he still looks sleepy. I have noticed, however, that some native speakers say, "Good morning," as a greeting the first time they see a person each morning.

"Good afternoon," sounds so formal to me that I never use it unless I'm being playful. "Good evening," also sounds too formal to use in ordinary situations, unless I'm joking.

People where I live never say, "Good day." We don't use it as a greeting or as a farewell. If anyone here says it, they are usually indicating playfulness by using an expression that is considered strange, archaic and overly formal. I think this is true for most Americans.

I would never use "good night" as a greeting. That's only for departure, and usually when you know you'll see the person again in the morning.
Jamie (K)
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Use of good morning/afternoon/evening #4 (permalink) Tue Sep 05, 2006 15:48 pm   Use of good morning/afternoon/evening
 

.
I'd say the "short form" of Good morning is pretty common: "Morning."
(No wet hair necessary, just the first greeting of the day. ;))
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