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'Referred to' versus 'Referred as'



 
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'Referred to' versus 'Referred as' #1 (permalink) Fri Sep 22, 2006 18:44 pm   'Referred to' versus 'Referred as'
 

Hi

The following sentences are the invention of my mind. Just snub the question if it does not make any sense to you please.

1- He was referred to the richest person in the city.
2- He was referred as the richest person in the city.

I think, the first sentence means that he was introduced/ taken to the richest person in the city. While the second one means that he was considered/ called the richest person in the city.

Do we agree?

Tom
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Referred #2 (permalink) Fri Sep 22, 2006 18:58 pm   Referred
 

Hi Tom,

Yes, you're spot on with both. Sometimes refer to can mean sent as a doctor's patient to a specialist Charlie went to see the doctor who was not absolutely sure what was wrong with him and so he arranged for Charlie to be referred to a specialist.

Alan
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'Referred to' versus 'Referred as' #3 (permalink) Fri Sep 22, 2006 19:00 pm   'Referred to' versus 'Referred as'
 

Hi Tom
Tom wrote:
The following sentences are the invention of my mind. Just snub the question if it does not make any sense to you please.
I wouldn't dream of ever snubbing you, Tom.


1- He was referred to the richest person in the city.
2- He was referred to as the richest person in the city.

He was thought to be the richest person in the city.
He was referred to as "Mr. Moneybags".

I think, the first sentence means that he was introduced/ taken to the richest person in the city. He was told to visit/sent to the richest person in the city.

While the second one means that he was considered/ called the richest person in the city. I think it would more likely be something more like a name: "He was called Mr. Moneybags".


I was uncomfortable with your "referred as" example. It may be a British vs American English thing. But, I changed it to what I would say: referred to as = called

Amy
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Oops #4 (permalink) Fri Sep 22, 2006 19:15 pm   Oops
 

Hi Tom,

Yes, mea culpa, oh dear, what a silly billy. Amy is quite right and she kindly covered up my slip by saying it was a British thing-I was so anxious not to snub you Tom that I said you were spot on. So let me put the matter staright. Alack, alas you were not spot on and it has to be referred to as

Reminds me - I need some new glasses.

Alan
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