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Difference between So and Very



 
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Difference between So and Very #1 (permalink) Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:46 am   Difference between So and Very
 

what is the difference between so and very? They are adverbs and can surely modify adjectives. Is there any specific difference between the two words, as to when and which word should be modified?

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Difference between So and Very #2 (permalink) Mon Oct 16, 2006 10:32 am   Difference between So and Very
 

.
So rarely appears-- at least in formal English-- except as a complex subordinator with that:

He is very stupid.
He is so stupid that he thinks Dom Perignon is a Mafia godfather.
He is so stupid.
-- this use is considered casual English: useful in conversation, but to be avoided in serious composition.
.
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So #3 (permalink) Mon Oct 16, 2006 10:43 am   So
 

Hi,

Just to add a note about 'so'. It is becoming popular in the UK to use expressions like: It's so yesterday (meaning it's very old fashioned) - It's so 1920s (meaning it's very much like something from that period). But of course these expressions are really a form of popular slang.

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Difference between So and Very #4 (permalink) Mon Oct 16, 2006 12:08 pm   Difference between So and Very
 

Mister Micawber wrote:
He is so stupid that he thinks Dom Perignon is a Mafia godfather.


:lol:

Perhaps it isn't so much stupidity as lack of general knowledge, though.
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Rhetorical question :) #5 (permalink) Mon Oct 16, 2006 12:35 pm   Rhetorical question :)
 

By the way, Amazon.co.uk offers a book named 'Why So Stupid? …'
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Difference between So and Very #6 (permalink) Wed Oct 18, 2006 11:14 am   Difference between So and Very
 

Mister Micawber wrote:
.
So rarely appears-- at least in formal English-- except as a complex subordinator with that:

He is very stupid.
He is so stupid that he thinks Dom Perignon is a Mafia godfather.
He is so stupid.
-- this use is considered casual English: useful in conversation, but to be avoided in serious composition.
.


Thanks a lot for the information. It makes a lot of sense. Actually, I am a newcomer here. I want to learn and improve my English. I am really learning a lot of things here.

Thanks once again.
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