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Expression: 'in no end of trouble'



 
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Expression: 'in no end of trouble' #1 (permalink) Mon Oct 30, 2006 3:25 am   Expression: 'in no end of trouble'
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #12 "No good", question 10

You'll get yourself in no end of trouble if you persist in refusing to pay those taxes.

(a) a certain amount
(b) a big amount
(c) a huge amount
(d) a special amount

English Idioms and Expressions, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #12 "No good", answer 10

You'll get yourself in a huge amount of trouble if you persist in refusing to pay those taxes.

Correct answer: (c) a huge amount

Your answer was: correct
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I think I have already asked toooo many questions today. I am going to put an end to it with this one.

Well, my question is: why not no end of troubles?

Thanks a lot! haihao
Haihao
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Expression: 'in no end of trouble' #2 (permalink) Mon Oct 30, 2006 4:52 am   Expression: 'in no end of trouble'
 

Hi Haihao

There is a standard expression "get in trouble". The word trouble is used as an uncountable noun in this case. The word trouble tends to be used mainly as a collective noun.

The expression "no end of" means "a great deal of" / "a huge amount of". This expression was added to the standard expression "get in trouble".

I'd say trouble is used mainly as an uncountable (singular) noun than as a countable (plural) one.

Amy
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Expression: 'in no end of trouble' #3 (permalink) Mon Oct 30, 2006 5:08 am   Expression: 'in no end of trouble'
 

Trouble is usually a noncountable noun and when used with "no end of" we don't add an s. No end of trouble is a fixed phrase. We tend to use words like problems as countable nouns.
Canadian45
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Expression: 'in no end of trouble' #4 (permalink) Mon Oct 30, 2006 5:39 am   Expression: 'in no end of trouble'
 

Thank you so much, Amy and Canadian45. Now I have got a clearer picture of the word as well as its usage. Your instructions also made me call to my mind that people say 'a lot of trouble' instead of 'a lot of troubles'.

Thanks again and I wish I hadn't got you two in no end of trouble with tooo many questions. (^o^)

My best regards to both of you.
haihao
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Expression: 'in no end of trouble' #5 (permalink) Mon Oct 30, 2006 6:18 am   Expression: 'in no end of trouble'
 

You're welcome, Haihao.
And it's OK to have no end of questions. :D

Amy
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Expression: 'in no end of trouble' #6 (permalink) Mon Oct 30, 2006 23:54 pm   Expression: 'in no end of trouble'
 

Haihao wrote:
... people say 'a lot of trouble' instead of 'a lot of troubles'.


And yet the plural is sometimes used:
    She has money troubles (problems/difficult situation).

    Yesterday all my troubles seemed so far away ...
    His troubles are over now (misfortune).

    Were you in the country at the time of the troubles (riots/disturbances)?
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Expression: 'in no end of trouble' #7 (permalink) Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:54 am   Expression: 'in no end of trouble'
 

Hi,

Just to add a bit more on the topic remember the lines spoken by the three witches at the beginning of Shakespeare's Macbeth as they forecast his future:

ALL. Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble

Just thought it might be appropriate for Hallowe'en!

A
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