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Applicant vs. subscriber



 
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Applicant vs. subscriber #1 (permalink) Wed Dec 01, 2004 8:10 am   Applicant vs. subscriber
 

Test No. incompl/advan-1 "Code of Practice", question 4

Thousands of ......... are already signing up for this new telephone service.

(a) individuals
(b) subscribers
(c) applicants
(d) interviewees

Test No. incompl/advan-1 "Code of Practice", answer 4

Thousands of subscribers are already signing up for this new telephone service.

Correct answer: (b) subscribers

Your answer was: incorrect
Thousands of applicants are already signing up for this new telephone service.
_________________________

Why not applicants?
Many thanks in advance.
Hassan
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Applicant vs. subscriber #2 (permalink) Wed Dec 01, 2004 8:27 am   Applicant vs. subscriber
 

Hi Hassan,

An applicant is a person who applies for job or another position. A subscriber is a customer, a person who purchases a service or a newspaper or magazine.

TOEIC short conversations: HR person calls job candidate to invite her to next interview.
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Ambiguous #3 (permalink) Thu Jul 14, 2005 5:17 am   Ambiguous
 

'Thousands of individuals' is definitely a commonly used English phrase. 'Subscribers' is possibly also correct, but if they are in the process of signing up, can they be called subscribers yet?

Also, 'simple example' is just as legitimate as 'prime example', important 'code of practice' be damned. Both are commonly used English phrases. Why is a simple example not possible in relation to a set of important rules? That just doesn't make sense.
anon_anon
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Query on SUBSCRIBER #4 (permalink) Sun Aug 21, 2005 6:28 am   Query on SUBSCRIBER
 

Your explanation and answer may be well and good BUT a SUBSCRIBER is ALSO someone who IS already SUBSCRIBING TO A SERVICE ... hence, shouldn't INDIVIDUALS also be acceptable since it mainly describes an OPEN MARKET wherein new consumers have yet to be referred to as SUBSCRIBERS?

The English language is vibrant and alive, hence, various nuances continually shatter age-old rigid standards. I think the most important aspect is that relevant meaning is properly presented. I took the test and received 8 out of 10, however, I feel that had INDIVIDUALS likewise be accepted, then it would have been 9/10.

Please enlighten.
norwin mark
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Code of practice, Question 4 #5 (permalink) Thu Aug 25, 2005 19:28 pm   Code of practice, Question 4
 

subscriber...are signing up: seems redundant.

Whould not a subcriber have signed up in the past?

An individual signing up now, may become a subcriber with persistant renewal, or with a history of service purchsed.
cpmallet
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"Individuals" vs. "Subscribers" #6 (permalink) Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:16 am   "Individuals" vs. "Subscribers"
 

To me a 'subscriber" is a person who has already signed up for something. In the context of this sentence "individuals" seems to make much more sense.
It's just a subjective point view.
Best regards,
Heike
Heike
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Code of practice, Question 4 #7 (permalink) Sun Dec 18, 2005 12:11 pm   Code of practice, Question 4
 

cpmallet wrote:
subscriber...are signing up: seems redundant.

Whould not a subcriber have signed up in the past?

An individual signing up now, may become a subcriber with persistant renewal, or with a history of service purchsed.

Yea, I also think in this way.
when they have become a subscriber, why should they sign up the NEW service?
Jason
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Subscribe/subscriber #8 (permalink) Sun Dec 18, 2005 12:47 pm   Subscribe/subscriber
 

Hi,

I'm intrigued at how much interest my test has engendered and in particular the sentence: Thousands of subscribers ... As I intended it, the people who are signing up for the new service are already subscribers and are signing up for a new service within the service they are already subscribing to. It folllows that they are not just individuals/applicants/interviewees.

In my experience if you are already a subscriber to a telephone service, you are constantly receiving information on extra facilities/services.

Can we leave it there?

Alan
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