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What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?


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What does this phrase mean: "point taken"? #1 (permalink) Wed Dec 01, 2004 16:06 pm   What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?
 

Test No. incompl/elem-28 "Responses", question 7

Mike: 'It's getting very late, we must hurry up.'
Jane: '.........'

(a) Point got.
(b) Point received.
(c) Point taken.
(d) Point held.

Test No. incompl/elem-28 "Responses", answer 7

Mike: 'It's getting very late, we must hurry up.'
Jane: 'Point taken.'

Correct answer: (c) Point taken.

Your answer was: correct
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what does that expression exactly mean?

Egon
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Point taken #2 (permalink) Wed Dec 01, 2004 16:09 pm   Point taken
 

Point taken means I agree, I accept what you are saying.

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Very or too #3 (permalink) Fri Jul 15, 2005 3:12 am   Very or too
 

hello!!, I'm from Argentina, this web is amazing!!, thank you. I have a doubt, when we must use ... very or too for late expression. I mean, it is very late or too late??
karish
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Very or too #4 (permalink) Sat Oct 29, 2005 7:16 am   Very or too
 

karish wrote:
hello!!, I'm from Argentina, this web is amazing!!, thank you. I have a doubt, when we must use ... very or too for late expression. I mean, it is very late or too late??
:)
Hello from Georgia (Near the Black sea Georgia)!
I am Georgian but I think we should use too late,yes, too late. Dear Karish, concerning the web,yes, it's great. I learn English from there. Bye. Keti.
Keti
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Sorry for being late #5 (permalink) Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:22 am   Sorry for being late
 

Hi Keti, good to hear you like our website. As for the expression you are talking about - it's probably I'm sorry for being late. Or I must apologize for being late.

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Point taken #6 (permalink) Mon Jan 16, 2006 16:20 pm   Point taken
 

Is it a formal expression?
pointe taken it's first time i've heard it. who uses this phrase? I think it's rarely used.
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Point taken #7 (permalink) Mon Jan 16, 2006 16:53 pm   Point taken
 

Polska wrote:
Is it a formal expression?
pointe taken it's first time i've heard it. who uses this phrase? I think it's rarely used.


Hi,

I have used the expression many times. I wouldn't say it was rare. It simply means I accept what you have said and will not argue about it.

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Very or too #8 (permalink) Mon Jan 16, 2006 20:34 pm   Very or too
 

karish wrote:
hello!!, I'm from Argentina, this web is amazing!!, thank you. I have a doubt, when we must use ... very or too for late expression. I mean, it is very late or too late??


Hello Karish!

1. 'Very late' means quite late, but not too late (still on time)

2. 'Too late' means you are not on time.

Examples (you've just arrived at the railway station):

1. I am very late, but I can still catch my train if I hurry.

2. I am too late and have missed my train (the train has already left)
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Very or too #9 (permalink) Wed Apr 11, 2007 19:32 pm   Very or too
 

Conchita wrote:
1. 'Very late' means quite late, but not too late (still on time)

Hi, Conchita

I always thought that on time has the idea of punctuality and therefore if you're late (no matter how much) then you cannot be on time.

Or did I get something wrong ?

thanks
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What does this phrase mean: "point taken"? #10 (permalink) Wed Apr 11, 2007 21:20 pm   What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?
 

Hi LS

Just some examples:

1.
I arrived at the train station very late, but fortunately not too late to catch my train.
(i.e. Maybe you wanted to buy a newspaper and have a cup of coffee at the station before you got on your train. But because you arrived very late, you couldn't do that. You arrived just in time to catch the train -- which left on time. :D)

2.
Imagine you are supposed to attend a meeting which is scheduled from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.:

Scenario A:
You arrive at 8:00 a.m. You have arrived in time to have a cup of coffee and review your notes before the meeting begins.

Scenario B:
You arrive at 8:30 a.m. You are right on time.

Scenario C:
You arrive at 8:40 a.m. You are late -- you are ten minutes late for the meeting.

Scenario D:
You arrive at 9:00 a.m. You are very late. You have missed half of the meeting.

Scenario E:
You arrive at 9:45 a.m. You are too late to attend even part of the meeting. The meeting finished as scheduled at 9:30 and you've missed the entire meeting.
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What does this phrase mean: "point taken"? #11 (permalink) Mon Nov 17, 2008 20:16 pm   What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?
 

Hi!
I know the phrase "point taken" only want to ask whether it has an equivalent like "point got'' is it a rude mistake to use that form?
Thanx beforehand!
Maryboo
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What does this phrase mean: "point taken"? #12 (permalink) Mon Nov 17, 2008 20:17 pm   What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?
 

Hi!
I know the phrase "point taken" only want to ask whether it has an equivalent like "point got'' is it a rude mistake to use that form?
Thanx beforehand!
Maryboo
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Joined: 06 Aug 2008
Posts: 9

What does this phrase mean: "point taken"? #13 (permalink) Tue Nov 18, 2008 0:06 am   What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?
 

Hello Maryboo,

Quite often, if you say "Point taken!", it implies that the other person has argued his case to an excessive degree, and that you are a little weary of the debate. So it might seem impolite or "tart".

If you accompany "Point taken!" with a nod and a particular facial expression, however – raised eyebrows, and eyes open wide – it avoids this implication.

Best wishes,

MrP
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What does this phrase mean: "point taken"? #14 (permalink) Wed Nov 19, 2008 17:11 pm   What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?
 

Hi!!!
Ok I got it!!! thanx a lot MrP :)
Best reagards
Maryboo
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Posts: 9

What does this phrase mean: "point taken"? #15 (permalink) Mon Feb 09, 2009 13:33 pm   What does this phrase mean: "point taken"?
 

Hi:
If you don´t want to sound quite rude, probably you can say "got it", or "I got it". :)
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