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Expression: to be up for something



 
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Idiom: face the music | Idiom: Are you in on the latest developments?
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Expression: to be up for something #1 (permalink) Thu Nov 09, 2006 6:57 am   Expression: to be up for something
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #7 "English Grammar Prepositions", question 7

I'm certainly up for it.

(a) willing to try
(b) ready to take
(c) wanting a chance
(d) keen to go

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #7 "English Grammar Prepositions", answer 7

I'm certainly willing to try it.

Correct answer: (a) willing to try

Your answer was: correct
_________________________

Under certain circumstance, is it not possible to select 'ready to take'?

Thank you.
Haihao
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Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

Expression: to be up for something #2 (permalink) Thu Nov 09, 2006 7:08 am   Expression: to be up for something
 

Hi Haihao

"Be up for" indicates a sense of willingness to do or interest in doing something, so the only other way you might define "be up for" would be "be interested in".

Amy
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"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
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