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What does this phrase mean: "all over"?



 
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ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Meaning of "hoarding may result" | Meaning of Demonym
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What does this phrase mean: "all over"? #1 (permalink) Sat Nov 11, 2006 19:33 pm   What does this phrase mean: "all over"?
 

"On all over the four channels it was the best film on the first".

"On all over the four channels" -is the sentence correct or is there any redundancy?
Moniker
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On all over #2 (permalink) Sat Nov 11, 2006 19:45 pm   On all over
 

moniker

That sentence is not good.
I think the sentence is trying to say: Of the four channels, the best film was on the first (one).

I don't think English speakers ever say "on all over".
Canadian45
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On all over #3 (permalink) Sat Nov 11, 2006 19:50 pm   On all over
 

Yes, it means that.
Could you suggest any case with "all over" word combination? If yes, what is it's meaning?
Thank you in advance
Moniker
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On all over #4 (permalink) Sat Nov 11, 2006 20:17 pm   On all over
 

''all over" is commonly used and has two different meanings.
1..."all over" means everywhere. It's raining all over Europe. (It's raining everywhere in Europe.)
2..."all over" means again. That wasn't good; do it all over. (That wasn't good; do it again.)

There is another meaning for "all over", although all is optional.
3..."all over" means everything is finished. The exams are (all) over. (The exams are [all] finished.)

Reminds me of that great Rolling Stones song! (I used to love her but) It's All Over Now.

I just remembered a 4th meaning. I'll give you two sentences and let you find the meaning(s). The band's fans were all over them. The press was all over the coach after the unexpected loss.
Canadian45
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Joined: 08 Oct 2006
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On all over #5 (permalink) Sat Nov 11, 2006 21:42 pm   On all over
 

This "over" actually has too many meanings, a little bit confounding.
In the second case 'all' may be opnional too, I suppose. Just "over" may signify "again" as in case:
"Do it over!" = "Do it again!"
The fourth meaning.. I've puzzled a little.
Does it mean "The band's fans were all with them" (near, around)? and "The press has surrounded the coach after the unexpected loss"?
Moniker
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Joined: 05 Nov 2006
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On all over #6 (permalink) Sat Nov 11, 2006 23:44 pm   On all over
 

We are not talking about the meanings of "over"; we are talking about "all over".
"all' can be optional in #2 but it is often said.

The fourth meaning is a little different in the two sentences. In the band sentence, it means 'in eagerly affectionate, attentive or aggressive pursuit of'. (a positive thing, unless they trampled the band to death)
In the coach sentence, it means 'in a state marked by all-out criticism of'. (a negative thing)

Another example of the negative meaning is My boss jumped all over me. This means that my boss severely scolded/criticized me.
Canadian45
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Joined: 08 Oct 2006
Posts: 651
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On all over #7 (permalink) Sun Nov 12, 2006 12:03 pm   On all over
 

Yes, to be sincere for the first time I've thought the same: "The fans all over them" and "the press all over him" in the meaning of: "the fans fell upon them" (excited, positively) and "the press attacked him" (with the intention of blaming and reproaching), but then I doubted due to my insecurity that this language may always harbour something unexpected for me.
Probably sometimes I should trust myself while sensing the meaning by untuition and not to go too far.
Thank you so much. You helped a lot.
Moniker
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Joined: 05 Nov 2006
Posts: 34

On all over #8 (permalink) Sun Nov 12, 2006 19:16 pm   On all over
 

You're welcome.
Canadian45
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Joined: 08 Oct 2006
Posts: 651
Location: Canada

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