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"Cheers": an informal greeting?


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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #1 (permalink) Wed Nov 15, 2006 21:56 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi!

Hope you excuse this stupid question! Listening to BFBS, today, I heard this expression and was able to understand "Cheers" in the sense of "Hello" or "Good bye" only.

Would like if anybody can clarify that to me.

Thanks in advance

Michael
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #2 (permalink) Wed Nov 15, 2006 22:14 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi Michael

I've heard that the Brits use "Cheers" to mean both hello and goodbye, but we'd better wait for someone from the UK to confirm (or deny ;)) that.

In the US, "Cheers" is probably thought of primarily as the name of a TV sitcom from the 80s and 90s and a famous pub in Boston. :lol: And "Cheers" may also still be used as a toast sometimes. :D

http://www.cheersboston.com/

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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #3 (permalink) Wed Nov 15, 2006 22:21 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi, I used to communicate with a US journalist and author who would often write "cheers" instead of "thanks" or "bye" as the closing line in his emails.

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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #4 (permalink) Wed Nov 15, 2006 22:24 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi all,
By one glance on Cambridge dictionary I found that:
Cheers:

1 a friendly expression said just before you drink an alcoholic drink:
Cheers! Your good health.

2 UK INFORMAL used to mean 'thank you':
"I've bought you a drink." "Cheers, mate."

3 UK INFORMAL used to mean 'goodbye':
"Bye." "Cheers, see you next week."

I hope it helps all of us and thank you Michael for this question.

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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #5 (permalink) Thu Nov 16, 2006 8:15 am   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi
bara wrote:
2 UK INFORMAL used to mean 'thank you':
"I've bought you a drink." "Cheers, mate."

3 UK INFORMAL used to mean 'goodbye':
"Bye." "Cheers, see you next week."
That's right.

Perhaps, 'Cheers' is one of the most often heard word I encounter during a day. (In the both above meanings.)

For example, a vast majority of people (in the area I live) surely will use it when you held a door behind yourself (this is an important and pleasant part of the social/local etiquette, regardless of your age, sex or whatever).
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #6 (permalink) Thu Nov 16, 2006 9:02 am   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi,

'Cheers' has become one of the most frequently used words in the UK as Tamara avers. To my generation of grumpy old men it sounds really odd because I was brought up to use 'cheers' as a salutation when you raised your glass to drink in company with others. Now it's just another word for saying all the things that Bara has listed. The really weird thing is that I heard myself using it for the first time ever to thank someone. I felt quite strange.

Cheers

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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #7 (permalink) Thu Nov 16, 2006 15:56 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

This reminds me that in December 2003 Alan wrote an excellent piece on "Cheers" and other greetings in English which you can read here: Well, hello!
http://www.english-test.net/newsletter/well-hello-96.html

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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #8 (permalink) Thu Nov 16, 2006 20:45 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi all and a kind cheers! :)

Thanks for all your replies.

Well, I see, there are lots of situations when "cheers" can be used. I also have read Alan?s short story and after having done that I think every language has such words. Like us German sometimes use "tschau" or in the Netherlands you often can hear "ha-y?" at several occassions.

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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #9 (permalink) Thu Nov 16, 2006 21:10 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

To Brits, is "cheers" just a shortened form of "cheerio" or "cheerie oh" (however it's spelled/phrased)?

Amy nailed the US use of "cheers"
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #10 (permalink) Fri Nov 17, 2006 15:26 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Cheerio is a colloquial word used as farewell.
Cheerio, old friends! :wink:
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #11 (permalink) Fri Nov 17, 2006 15:33 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Danke
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #12 (permalink) Sat Oct 25, 2008 13:26 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

I was just thinking of the 'cheers' issue again. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, I used to work with and for an American journalist/script writer/English teacher who would often use 'cheers' in his email instead of 'thanks/bye/regards'. Maybe he used/uses 'cheers' because he has been living in Germany for quite a while where you communicated and worked with English speakers from Europe?

Please let me know what you think on this.
Cheers,
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #13 (permalink) Sat Oct 25, 2008 14:49 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Hi Torsten

I've picked up quite a few expressions and usages that I would consider "British" from British colleagues and friends -- and also from British ESL books and on ESL forums. And I'm still picking things up. You've probably noticed that I ask questions about British usage fairly often right here on the forum. ;)

Thanks to this forum, I also now know what "bed tea" is (but I never actually use that expression with any Americans I know). :lol:

As for your American friend, why don't just you ask him how/why/when he started using "cheers" in his e-mail?
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #14 (permalink) Sat Oct 25, 2008 22:16 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

I use the word 'cheers' all the time as a light form of 'thanks', normally only when speaking to other males. It seems to have a mutually known meaning that's somewhere between acknowledgment and thanks. Of course, I'm sure plenty of people use it instead of 'goodbye'.
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"Cheers": an informal greeting? #15 (permalink) Sun Oct 26, 2008 12:56 pm   "Cheers": an informal greeting?
 

Yankee wrote:
Thanks to this forum, I also now know what "bed tea" is (but I never actually use that expression with any Americans I know). :lol:

.

Someone's just brought me one :D

Here's a different situation:

Have you already eaten your tea?
- No, I usually have dinner at night.
OK, will I come round like 7ish then and bring some beers?
- That'd be nice, cheers!
Not a bother, let's go watch telly now.
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