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Kudos or what?



 
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Kudos or what? #1 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 17:22 pm   Kudos or what?
 

Hi, it seems that "kudoing" has become quite popular amongst the internet community. Of course, there is no such verb as 'to kudo' -- at least not yet. My question is, what is your take on extending/offering/accepting kudos? In other words: Are you an active 'kudoer' or a rather passive one?

Kudos in advance,
Torsten

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Kudos or what? #2 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 19:35 pm   Kudos or what?
 

I no longer use the congratulatory word "kudos". However, there was a time when I did.

I think it's a noun.

One does not kudo, per se; rather, one gives kudos.

"Kudos on the promotion, Ricky Bobby. They surely picked the right person for the job!"

I only ever knew "kudos" as a substitute for "congratulations" or "way to go".
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Kudos or what? #3 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 20:10 pm   Kudos or what?
 

Hi Torsten

The word kudos is not new to me either. And I only know it spelled with an 's'.

But it does seem that the usage has grown -- at least in cyberspace.

It may be difficult to agree on a universally accepted verb form or on a noun meaning 'one who often gives kudos' since there is still debate over whether the word kudos is singular or plural. Some experts say the word kudos is singular (and therefore there is no such thing as a 'kudo').

So, the verb might have to be 'kudose' -- which sounds suspiciously like you're snoozing.

And a person who often provides kudos might have to be called a 'kudoser' -- which for some reason reminds me of a bulldozer. :lol: 8)

Amy
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Kudos or what? #4 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 20:25 pm   Kudos or what?
 

dude, i finished your final sentence for you before I read it.

lol

good thinking.
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Kudos or what? #5 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 21:22 pm   Kudos or what?
 

Hi

Quote:
Some experts say the word kudos is singular (and therefore there is no such thing as a 'kudo').

My dictionary says that kudo (single) is a derivative from kudos.

Giving 1 glory 2 fame 3 renown 4 prestige as synonyms for kudos

And 1 award 2 honour 3 compliment 4 praise – as synonyms for kudo
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Kudos or what? #6 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 21:37 pm   Kudos or what?
 

.
It seems to me the word 'praise' would fit better under 'kudos' if we're going to separate kudo and kudos into countable and non-countable forms. ;)

Tamara, is that the same dictionary with the interesting definition for 'snowshoe'? 8)
.
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Kudos or what? #7 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 21:39 pm   Kudos or what?
 

Quote:
Tamara, is that the same dictionary with the interesting definition for 'snowshoe'?
No, Amy. Another one 8)

:)
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Kudos or what? #8 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 22:16 pm   Kudos or what?
 

I wonder what the people of M&M/Mars think about their product being tossed around without a capital K.

hehe

like kleenex... Kimberly-Clark went on a massive ad campaign in (I think) the 1970s and/or 1980s to remind people that Kleenex is a brand of tissue; tissue, per se, is not kleenex.
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Kudos or what? #9 (permalink) Tue Dec 12, 2006 22:18 pm   Kudos or what?
 

They did this because for eons people had referred to all facial tissue as Kleenex (or, in their minds, "kleenex").

"Give me a kleenex, Norm."

as opposed to its proper use:

"Give me a Kleenex brand facial tissue, Norm."

hehe
------------

It's the same thing with Coke here in the South: to some, every type/brand of soda is a Coke.

I hear this all the time from the Ex:

"Tom, go get me a Coke."

I know that she wants Diet Coke... but she has long since stopped making such petty distinctions as Diet Coke, Coke, Sprite, Pepsi, root beer, etc... they're all Coke.

If I get the wrong kind, it's "I didn't ask for that kind of Coke."

Sometimes I actually get her an actual Coke, just to piss her off. lol

"But Freda, you asked for a Coke."

-----------------

My third example of a brand-name product being ingested into the bubbling cauldron that represents the guts of the American lexicon is the Band-Aid (I think it's hyphenated, anyway... i'm not going to check.).

The proper generic term, I think, is either "adhesive bandage" or simply "bandage"... but to nearly everyone I've ever known -- whether the product is a Curad, Johnson & Johnson, whatever -- when someone has a cut or a scrape, a Band-Aid is requested.
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