Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
depot; wholesale store; large retail store
track
repeat
size
warehouse
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

When do we use has, have, and had?



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Key word transformation | Should the letter behind the dash of a combine-word be upper or lower case?
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
When do we use has, have, and had? #1 (permalink) Thu Dec 21, 2006 21:39 pm   When do we use has, have, and had?
 

when do you use has, have, and had?

what is the difference between
if Bob did his homework, he can go out to play.

if Bob has done his homework, he can go out to play

"has done" is future perfect, does that imply that Bob will continue doing his homework in the future?
You only use "has" when it's third person singular, right? she has, Bob has, ect.
John had hoped to have won the trophy.
Does this mean, John hoped to win the trophy before the competition began? Why is it "to have won" ? I only know has won is wrong because it doesn't sound right, but John is third person singular so shouldn't it be "has" won?

Thanks~!
Myc
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 17 Dec 2006
Posts: 15

When do we use has, have, and had? #2 (permalink) Fri Dec 22, 2006 1:10 am   When do we use has, have, and had?
 

when using perfect tense

present perfect tense

He, she , or It(3rd person singular) + has + past participle

I, you, we, they + have + past participle

Past perfect tense

doesn't matter whether 3rd person singular or not, always use had + past participle

"if Bob has done his homework" I don't think "has done" is future perfect tense, it is present perfect tense, and it doesn't imply that he will continue to do his homework. If you mean that he has done some of his homework but will continue . I guess it should be " Bob has been doing his homework"

"has won" is not wrong when using 3rd person singular in a present perfect tense
Bodum
New Member


Joined: 22 Dec 2006
Posts: 1

In this story you'll learn everything about the passive voiceEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Learn how to explore English words! Subscribe to free email English course
When do we use has, have, and had? #3 (permalink) Fri Dec 22, 2006 7:40 am   When do we use has, have, and had?
 

hi myc
i think you'd better say " If Bob finishes (or has finished) the homework, he can go out to play"
Danial2007
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 11

When do we use has, have, and had? #4 (permalink) Fri Dec 22, 2006 9:56 am   When do we use has, have, and had?
 

Hi myc

myc wrote:
when do you use has, have, and had?

what is the difference between
if Bob did his homework, he can go out to play.

if Bob has done his homework, he can go out to play

"has done" is future perfect, does that imply that Bob will continue doing his homework in the future?

Has done is the present perfect tense of do. Your sentences mean the same thing to me:
If it is true that Bob did/has (already) done his homework, he can go out to play.

myc wrote:
You only use "has" when it's third person singular, right? she has, Bob has, ect.

Has is the present tense form of the verb have and is used with third person singular.
Has done is the present perfect of do in the third person singular.

myc wrote:
John had hoped to have won the trophy. Does this mean, John hoped to win the trophy before the competition began? Why is it "to have won" ? I only know has won is wrong because it doesn't sound right, but John is third person singular so shouldn't it be "has" won?
The sentence means "John hoped to win the trophy, but he didn't."
"To have won" is the perfect infinitive of the verb win. I think this link might help you:
http://www.bartleby.com/116/214.html

Amy
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

please explain #5 (permalink) Mon May 04, 2009 14:48 pm   please explain
 

I want to know about the use of "has had & have had" please explain where we use has had or has have & have had.
thanks
Kiran.
Kiran
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Apr 2009
Posts: 14

When do we use has, have, and had? #6 (permalink) Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:36 am   When do we use has, have, and had?
 

You use has, have, and had if you do not care about the "time" and if the time is not definite. For example, It hasn't rained this week. < I use has because the date or day is not definite and don't care about the day/time. And now, I'm going to use "did", here it goes: It didn't rain LAST WEEK. Meaning, you have a definite time here, because you are pertaining to the whole week.

Secondly, you use HAS, HAVE if you are still doing the things you do in the past until the present. But when you use Had, it means that you are already DONE with it in the past. There's also the use of "Had Had", I'm going to give you an example, "I had had a girlfriend before her", here, it means you had 2 girlfriends before your present girlfriend, 1st girlfriend broke up, and then here comes the 2nd, and finally your present girlfriend.

Has done is not a future perfect, it's a present perfect. Just like what I said, you use has if you are still doing the things you do in the past until the present. Bob has done, is present, so it means that he JUST finished his homework recently. You use "had done" if BOB finished his homework a day before, or an hours before.

Has had, have had, have had. "Has had and have had" have the same explanation because, has is for singular and have is for plural. You use them, if you are referring to unfinished time/ or let's say an unfinished time of event. Meaning, its telling about the action began in the past, but not reached its end. You use that if you are about to feel something, but you already decided to do that before reaching the 100% of doing that particular activity(you get it?, quite confusing is it not?). Ok, I'm just going to give you an example, here's the sentence: "I HAVE HAD enough of you!". In this sentence you are angry, then you're just holding your anger for about an hour, so in your mind, before you reach your maximum ANGER(before it reaches a 100%), you'll just say that you have had enough of this person.

Hope you understand. :)
Compaq321
New Member


Joined: 27 Jun 2009
Posts: 1

Thanks #7 (permalink) Sat Jun 27, 2009 11:32 am   Thanks
 

Thanks a lot for your reply. I got it. :)
Kiran
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Apr 2009
Posts: 14

When do we use has, have, and had? #8 (permalink) Sun Jun 03, 2012 23:22 pm   When do we use has, have, and had?
 

What a useful an explanations! Thank you soo much!
Julietxxx
New Member


Joined: 12 May 2012
Posts: 2

Display posts from previous:   
Key word transformation | Should the letter behind the dash of a combine-word be upper or lower case?
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
it turned out that he overstatedpossessiveWhere were you working?requsetate greedilywin/win inPresent simple & Future tenseTensesplease edit this letterPast TenseWord formationwhat is the difference between minimal and minimum?what is the differece from the following sentences?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail