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Cloze Passage



 
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ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Common nouns, unusual verbs: "Breakfast, something" etc | Present simple negative
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Cloze Passage #1 (permalink) Thu Dec 28, 2006 20:33 pm   Cloze Passage
 

Hi

Could you please give me some information about "Cloze passages"? Why do we spell it with a "z"? Was "Cloze" some English professor who introduced them?

Many thanks in advance...

Tom
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Cloze Passage #2 (permalink) Thu Dec 28, 2006 20:40 pm   Cloze Passage
 

Hi Tom,

This word 'cloze' appears to come from 'closure' (notice the sound of that word) suggesting completion. In other words you complete the sentence by supplying the missing word as in our 'Incomplete sentences' on this site.

A
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Cloze Passage #3 (permalink) Thu Dec 28, 2006 21:47 pm   Cloze Passage
 

Alan wrote:
This word 'cloze' appears to come from 'closure' (notice the sound of that word) suggesting completion. In other words you complete the sentence by supplying the missing word as in our 'Incomplete sentences' on this site.

The Oxford dictionaries confirm this. So, it's fact, and not only Alan's opinion.
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Cloze Passage #4 (permalink) Thu Dec 28, 2006 22:40 pm   Cloze Passage
 

Phew!!!
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Cloze Passage #5 (permalink) Fri Dec 29, 2006 6:24 am   Cloze Passage
 

Alan wrote:
Phew!!!

Well, you said "appears to be". That made it sound like you weren't sure or hadn't checked any reference to confirm your conclusion. That is, unless I misunderstand the British usage of "appears to be". For all I know, some British people may rush from a house in flames, call the fire department and say, "My house appears to be on fire."

I do know that sometimes when the British say, "Well done," it means, "Well done," but at other times it means, "You've really botched that up."
Jamie (K)
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Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

Cloze Passage #6 (permalink) Fri Dec 29, 2006 10:32 am   Cloze Passage
 

Quote:
The Oxford dictionaries confirm this. So, it's fact, and not only Alan's opinion


Hi

Could you please tell me the difference between "fact" and "a fact"? I have always treated it as a countable noun! :shock: When can I possibly treat it as an uncountable noun??

Many thanks in advance

Yours

Tom
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Cloze Passage #7 (permalink) Fri Dec 29, 2006 13:41 pm   Cloze Passage
 

Tom wrote:
Could you please tell me the difference between "fact" and "a fact"? I have always treated it as a countable noun! :shock: When can I possibly treat it as an uncountable noun??

That's a good question. There doesn't seem to be a difference. In the sentence I used, I could just as well have said "a fact". I have checked dictionaries, and they show examples of the word both as a countable and uncountable noun, but they don't explain why. All I can see is that after the preposition "in" and the phrase "as a matter of" the word takes no article. It also has no article and is uncountable when it means events or situations that have really occurred.

You can get a little bit of explanation if you look up "fact" in this Longman online dictionary: http://www.ldoceonline.com
Jamie (K)
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Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6761
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

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