Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
garbage; refuse; scrap
dictate
mistreatment
fuel
discard
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Idiom "Hear hear"



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Expression: 'Further to our discussion regarding my medium of education...' | Toothache vs. a Toothache
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Idiom "Hear hear" #1 (permalink) Mon Jan 29, 2007 7:47 am   Idiom "Hear hear"
 

Hi,

Could you tell me if the idiom 'Hear hear' has only the ironical meaning for 'agree' or does not have to be so?

haiaho
Haihao
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

Idiom "Hear hear" #2 (permalink) Mon Jan 29, 2007 10:10 am   Idiom "Hear hear"
 

Hi,

It suggests that you are expressing total agreement with what has been said. If you are sitting in an audience listening to a speaker and something they say strikes you as absolutely right, you would call out: 'Hear, hear' and thereby signal your agreement with the sentiment expressed. If you listen to a debate in our (UK) Parliament, you can often here members call out these words.

A
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16542
Location: UK

Learn all about English adverbs in this amusing storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Here is how you can learn English the fun way! Click to subscribe to free email English course
Idiom "Hear hear" #3 (permalink) Mon Jan 29, 2007 11:16 am   Idiom "Hear hear"
 

Alan wrote:
If you listen to a debate in our (UK) Parliament, you can often hear members call out these words.


The first time I saw a debate in Parliament on TV, I was absolutely amazed to hear all this shouting. I thought they were saying 'yeah, yeah!' (which seemed totally out of place), and it reminded me of gospel masses (or whatever they are called) where people are continuously shouting praises (I wish our masses were half as exciting!).
Conchita
Language Coach


Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

Display posts from previous:   
Expression: 'Further to our discussion regarding my medium of education...' | Toothache vs. a Toothache
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
Frequently misspelt wordsmeaning of "on the off chance"Can we use the word 'topless' for a man who is wearing only his trousers?'life vs livesSince I've watched a movie vs. Since I watched a moviePhrase: (I) don't mind if I doExpression: 'Civilian targets were bombed in reprisal for the raid.'Expression: 'She reported (his) having seen the gunman.''form(s) is (are) displayed' vs 'form(s) is/are displayed'Participle: Why there are no 'is' after 1. 'it' and 2. 'as'?'Abuse' vs 'Call names''Reputation' or 'A reputation'? 'It takes a lifetime to build a reputation.'difference between literary English and classical English

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail