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An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind



 
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ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
What does "No man is an island" imply? | Is it correct to use "some" in negative and interrogative sentences?
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An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind #1 (permalink) Fri Apr 06, 2007 8:47 am   An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind
 

Hi teachers,

Could you please explain the quote above to me?

Many thanks in advance

Jupiter
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An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind #2 (permalink) Fri Apr 06, 2007 11:12 am   An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind
 

This quote, attributed to Gandhi, refers to (and criticises) an Old Testament law: 'An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth', which meant that one could take revenge or repay evil for evil.

The law was revoked by Christ. In fact, Jesus gave us a new commandment: 'Love one another as I have loved you'.
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