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use of the word swelled



 
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use of the word swelled #1 (permalink) Thu Jun 28, 2007 15:13 pm   use of the word swelled
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #265 "Irregular Verbs Test (13)", question 6

After I accidentally slammed my finger in the car door, it ......... up and turned blue.

(a) swell
(b) swelled
(c) swollen

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #265 "Irregular Verbs Test (13)", answer 6

After I accidentally slammed my finger in the car door, it swelled up and turned blue.

Correct answer: (b) swelled
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use of the word swelled in a sentence

Mahatma
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Swell #2 (permalink) Thu Jun 28, 2007 17:17 pm   Swell
 

Hello,
Swell, in this case, means to slowly become larger - beyond a normal level; to puff out. Sometimes, when a body part is injured, that part may swell (puff out.) For example, if you sprain an ankle, it is likely that there's going to be some swelling there.
I hope this helps.
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use of the word swelled #3 (permalink) Fri Jun 29, 2007 6:20 am   use of the word swelled
 

Hi

Quote:
After I accidentally slammed my finger in the car door, it swelled up and turned blue.

Could you please tell me what exactly happened in the red part? How can one slam one's finger in the car door?

Many thanks

Tom
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Car door #4 (permalink) Fri Jun 29, 2007 9:55 am   Car door
 

Hello Tom,
When someone slams their finger between the car door and the frame - when a person tries to shut the car door but his/her finger gets in the way - it's very painful. But, I don't think people say the exact and literal phrase "I slammed my finger in the car door frame" or "I slammed my finger in the area where the car door meets its frame or hinged portion."
But, maybe there's a better way of saying it that I don't know of. Let me know what you think.
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use of the word swelled #5 (permalink) Sun Jul 01, 2007 10:22 am   use of the word swelled
 

Hi, Linda

I am not a native speaker of English, so asking me what's better is not really very wise. :shock:

How about:

Quote:
My finger swelled up and turned blue when it accidentally caught in the car door.


Tom
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Swelled up #6 (permalink) Sun Jul 01, 2007 10:46 am   Swelled up
 

Hi Tom,
The phrase you asked about should read:
"My finger swelled up and turned blue when it accidentally got caught in the car door." This sentence has the same meaning as the test question you originally asked about. And, in both cases, it's OK to use the word "in."
"After I accidentally slammed my finger in the car door, it swelled up and turned blue."

Let me know if you have any further questions. :D
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