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use of the adverb 'hardly'



 
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use of the adverb 'hardly' #1 (permalink) Wed Jul 25, 2007 8:43 am   use of the adverb 'hardly'
 

Hi,guys

Change the sentences using hardly or hardly ever,keeping the same meaning.

Ex1.John doesn't buy many CDs.
John hardly buys any CDs.

May I say 'John hardly buys CDs' without adding 'any'?

Ex2. Lucy doesn't have many friends.
Lucy has hardly any friends.

May I say 'Lucky hardly has any friends'?

Ex3. I don't often think about him these days.
I hardly ever think about him these days.

May I say 'I hardly think about him these days'? When I need to add 'ever' and when I don't need to add it?

Thanks so much in advance.

Maggie :wink:
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use of the adverb 'hardly' #2 (permalink) Wed Jul 25, 2007 13:18 pm   use of the adverb 'hardly'
 

.
Ex1.John doesn't buy many CDs.
John buys hardly any CDs.

May I say 'John hardly buys CDs' without adding 'any'? -- No; this is the wrong structure; see my correction above.

Ex2. Lucy doesn't have many friends.
Lucy has hardly any friends.

May I say 'Lucy hardly has any friends'? -- Not really; as with your #1, people may say this, but the adverb is too far from its referent for the correct formal structure.

Ex3. I don't often think about him these days.
I hardly ever think about him these days.

May I say 'I hardly think about him these days'? When I need to add 'ever' and when I don't need to add it? -- The ever is optional, and is used when it modifies a verb; the ever is an intensifier.
.

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use of the adverb 'hardly' #3 (permalink) Wed Jul 25, 2007 18:37 pm   use of the adverb 'hardly'
 

Hi,MM

I have one more question.

May I say 'Lucy hardly has any friends'? -- Not really; as with your #1, people may say this, but the adverb is too far from its referent for the correct formal structure.

Here the referent is 'friends'. Am I right?

Thanks again.

Maggie^^
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Maggie
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Location: Taiwan

use of the adverb 'hardly' #4 (permalink) Wed Jul 25, 2007 23:31 pm   use of the adverb 'hardly'
 

.
I think the referent is 'any'-- 'How many friends does she have?' - 'Hardly any.'
.
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use of the adverb 'hardly' #5 (permalink) Thu Jul 26, 2007 3:21 am   use of the adverb 'hardly'
 

Hi,MM

Thanks very much.

Maggie ^^
_________________
In my view,the more mistakes someone else corrects me,the more I could learn.
And welcome to my blog: http://0rz.tw/793HL
Maggie
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Posts: 398
Location: Taiwan

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