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The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small?



 
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The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small? #1 (permalink) Thu Sep 06, 2007 15:05 pm   The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small?
 

Hi

I have seen both versions--could you please tell me if both are correct?

Quote:
1- Can I help you, sir?
2- Can I help you, Sir?


Tom

PS: Is my use of the word "versions" correct in the given context?
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The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small? #2 (permalink) Thu Sep 06, 2007 16:37 pm   The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small?
 

.
I'd use your first version, Tom.
.
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The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small? #3 (permalink) Thu Sep 06, 2007 18:31 pm   The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small?
 

Hi Tom,

The usual form of address would be lower case 's'. The capital 'S' could be used in narrative when perhaps the man was of particular importance as with a woman 'madam' 'Madam'. Then of course in the UK the capital 'S' + the first name of a man is used as a title - a so-called knighthood given by the monarch if the individual has made a major contribution in a particular field. Further details could no doubt be supplied by our friend, Englishuser.

Alan
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The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small? #4 (permalink) Thu Sep 06, 2007 20:01 pm   The use of 'Sir': Capital 'S' or small?
 

Many thanks, Amy and Alan

In Jane Eyre, throughout "Sir" has been written with a capital 'S'--however in my book "Skills in English", at many places it has been written with a lower case.

Tom

PS: Is my use of throughout correct here?
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