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'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to'



 
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ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Translation please. | go+gerund
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'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to' #1 (permalink) Tue Jan 18, 2005 21:23 pm   'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to'
 

Dear Torsten and alan:

I have a doubt on this. Do you say "with regard to" or "with regards to" ?
I found it written or said in both ways, are the two of them correct?

Thank you very much.
Ch01_Kelly
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Regard #2 (permalink) Wed Jan 19, 2005 10:31 am   Regard
 

Hi,

An interesting question, thank you. Sometimes expressions get muddled up and very often the muddled expressions then become acceptable but at the moment these two expressions are different in construction. With regard to means about or concerning. The other expression is as regards, which means very much the same. All I can imagine is that what you have seen is a muddled up version of the two. The other complication is that regards can also be used to mean good wishes as in send my regards to your uncle.

Hope this helps

Alan
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Thank you Alan #3 (permalink) Wed Jan 19, 2005 18:32 pm   Thank you Alan
 

It's clearer now. Thank you Alan
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In this regards or in this regard #4 (permalink) Thu Jul 21, 2005 17:57 pm   In this regards or in this regard
 

Dear Alan,

I am an English Second Language speaker and I was looking for the use of "regards" when I found your explanation.

I have a doubt related to the use of "in this regards" as a conector in the beginning of a paragraph. Could you please confirm what is the correct way to say such expression "in this regards" or "in this regard"?

Thank you!

Nandayure Le?n Valenzuela
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In this regards and in these regards #5 (permalink) Thu Jul 21, 2005 18:55 pm   In this regards and in these regards
 

It is either in this regard (singular) or in these regards (plural).

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'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to' #6 (permalink) Fri Jan 27, 2006 0:59 am   'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to'
 

I don't have an exact answer, but consider the following:

Business English is deadly enough without scrambling it. “As regards your downsizing plan . . .” is acceptable, if stiff. “In regard to” “and “with regard to” are also correct. But “in regards to” is nonstandard. You can also convey the same idea with “in respect to” or “with respect to.”

http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/regard.html
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Regards #7 (permalink) Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:19 am   Regards
 

Hi,

Thanks for that. All those expressions sound a bit wordy. I think I prefer the one word: concerning.

Alan
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'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to' #8 (permalink) Thu Mar 11, 2010 18:10 pm   'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to'
 

Hello Alan,

I realise that we are some years since the original query and your replies, but I have a related question and would appreciate your assistance.

I have often seen different versions of the phrase written. Most of these conform with your examples above. However, I was wondering if 'to' is always required?

For example, "auteur theory is especially pertinent with regards autonomous experimental directors, but less so when concerning mainstream directors".

I am sure that I have seen the phrase written without the 'to', but this could have simply come down to poor grammar on the part of the writer, or possibly subject-specific grammar - trends forming within certain subjects, such as cinema-specific words: diegetic, intra-diegetic, extra-diegetic, et cetera.

Thanks,
Sergei (Film student, if you had not guessed with the film-related example and words).
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'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to' #9 (permalink) Thu Mar 11, 2010 20:40 pm   'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to'
 

Hi,

I tend to say either with 'regard to or simply 'regarding' or 'as regards' in this sort of example:

I find your explanation regarding/with regard to/as regards the theory, quite acceptable

Alan
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'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to' #10 (permalink) Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:41 am   'With regard ...' vs. 'regards ... to'
 

Thanks Alan!
Sictransit
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