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Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'?



 
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Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'? #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 19, 2007 1:43 am   Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'?
 

Synonyms Lesson, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #110 "Synonyms for alone and lonesome", question 10

The nights were the worst part for she was haunted by ......... thoughts which were killing her.

(a) alone
(b) lonely
(c) lonesome
(d) single

Synonyms Lesson, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #110 "Synonyms for alone and lonesome", answer 10

The nights were the worst part for she was haunted by lonesome thoughts which were killing her.

Correct answer: (c) lonesome

Your answer was: incorrect
The nights were the worst part for she was haunted by single thoughts which were killing her.
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I am not sure about 'for' in this sentence. Could any one explain the reason of using 'for' to me? Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'? Is there anything i leave out or can't see? I think it would be better if 'beccause' was used here. Am i right?

Thank you.
Mirka
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Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'? #2 (permalink) Mon Nov 19, 2007 5:35 am   Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'?
 

.'
Yes, 'for' means 'because', and either can be used here; it was the writer's choice to use 'for'. The only differences in usage are that only 'because' can begin a sentence, and 'for' is considered a bit more formal.
.
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Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'? #3 (permalink) Sat Mar 19, 2011 9:44 am   Couldnt 'of that' or 'because' be used here instead of 'for'?
 

Hello,

After studying some replies to questions about "lonesome" and "lonely", I find both "lonesome" and "lonely" make no difference to the sentence of this Question 10. Furthermore, they are synonymous according to Dictionary.reference.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lonesome) and Thefreedictionary.com (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/lonely). Please correct me if am wrong.

Here are some replies to the questions about "lonesome" and "lonely":

Quote:
#2 (permalink) Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:41 am difference between lonely, lonesome and solitary
________________________________________
.
'Lonely' and 'lonesome' have the same meaning: alone and unhappy about it.
'Solitary' means alone and either happy or neutral about it.
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#3 (permalink) Tue Sep 09, 2008 13:17 pm How can I distinguish "lonely" from "lonesome"?
________________________________________
Hi thang,

Basically they mean the same and are often interchangeable, but there are situations when you can make the following distinctions.

Usually, when people who are lonely they are alone and unhappy about it.

Joe is very lonely after his wife's death.

Things can be lonesome if you want to attach a sad and lonely characteristic to them.

This lonesome blues puts me in a melancholic mood every time I hear it.

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#4 (permalink) Tue Sep 09, 2008 13:18 pm How can I distinguish "lonely" from "lonesome"?
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"At the top of the hill stood one lonely tree."

Things can be lonely also.
Jamie (K)
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Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6195
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

http://www.english-test.net/forum/ftopic28566.html


Many thanks.

Best wishes,
Bhikkhu1991a.
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