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Could you distinguish the meaning of 'tiresome' from the meaning of 'tired'?



 
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Could you distinguish the meaning of 'tiresome' from the meaning of 'tired'? #1 (permalink) Fri Dec 21, 2007 13:26 pm   Could you distinguish the meaning of 'tiresome' from the meaning of 'tired'?
 

Could you distinguish the meaning of "tiresome" from the meaning of "tired"
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Duc
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PLEASE TELL ME WHY #2 (permalink) Fri Dec 21, 2007 16:34 pm   PLEASE TELL ME WHY
 

This is a tiresome job and I am tired of it.
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PLEASE TELL ME WHY #3 (permalink) Sat Dec 22, 2007 5:07 am   PLEASE TELL ME WHY
 

Oh I am sorry . Could you distinguish the meaning of "tiresome" from one of "tiring"!!!
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PLEASE TELL ME WHY #4 (permalink) Sat Dec 22, 2007 6:56 am   PLEASE TELL ME WHY
 

Even though you could say, "This is job is tiring", it's actually never used in English.
Just stick to "tiresome" when you want to describe something and everything will be fine.
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PLEASE TELL ME WHY #5 (permalink) Sat Dec 22, 2007 9:09 am   PLEASE TELL ME WHY
 

Hi, GeoTop

To tell the difference between "tiresome" and "tiring", lets look them up in a dictionary.
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=83364&dict=CALD
Quote:
tiresome means boring or annoying; causing a lack of patience:
I find it very tiresome doing the same job day after day.
He has the tiresome habit of finishing your sentences for you.



http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=83355&dict=CALD
Quote:
tiring means making you feel tired, in need of rest or sleep:
I've had a very tiring day.
Looking after the kids is extremely tiring.



See?

BuddhaGeo wrote:
Even though you could say, "This is job is tiring", it's actually never used in English.
Just stick to "tiresome" when you want to describe something and everything will be fine.

I don't think you're right. I think the sentence "This job is tiring" is OK and used in the English language.
Anyway, let's wait for teachers to elaborate on the question.
Lost_Soul
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PLEASE TELL ME WHY #6 (permalink) Sat Dec 22, 2007 12:54 pm   PLEASE TELL ME WHY
 

Yeap, your elaboration on this subject was definitely of more profound nature than mine. :D
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