Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to describe; to depict; to portray; to outline
budget
characterize
peddle
rent
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

more clever or cleverer



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
need a vocabulary word. | Questions
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
more clever or cleverer #1 (permalink) Sat Dec 29, 2007 18:05 pm   more clever or cleverer
 

Hi,

which is correct: more clever or cleverer? and more polite or politer?

Thanks
Liza
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 20 Feb 2007
Posts: 113

more clever or cleverer #2 (permalink) Sat Dec 29, 2007 20:10 pm   more clever or cleverer
 

Hi Liza,

I'm happy with either. Possibly I would prefer 'cleverer' but I wouldn't describe 'more clever' as incorrect.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16525
Location: UK

What do you know about the progressive forms?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Have you read a good anecdote today? Subscribe to free email English course
more clever or cleverer #3 (permalink) Sat Dec 29, 2007 22:15 pm   more clever or cleverer
 

Dear Alan,

Thank you so much for your quick reply. May I have one more question in connection with this?

Which ending is correct?

He is cleverer than me.
He is cleverer than I.
He is clevere than I am.

Your dog is cleverer than my dog.
Your dog is celevrer than my dog is.
Your dog is clevere than mine.
Your dog is clevere than mine is.

Thanks a lot!
bye
Liza
Liza
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 20 Feb 2007
Posts: 113

more clever or cleverer #4 (permalink) Thu May 27, 2010 9:58 am   more clever or cleverer
 

Certainly cleverer or more clever than me. It should be -than I am instead of I but -I am is not logical. If someone is cleverer than someone else is (cleverer) then who is cleverer? If you get what I mean.
Keefe
New Member


Joined: 27 May 2010
Posts: 1

more clever or cleverer #5 (permalink) Thu May 27, 2010 10:34 am   more clever or cleverer
 

He is cleverer than me. - Wrong
He is cleverer than I. - Correct
He is cleverer than I am. - Correct


Although this is debated, "than" is a conjunction in these sentences, not a preposition, so a subject pronoun is needed. The verb "to be" is implied. You cannot say "He is cleverer than me is."

Even if some prefer to consider it a preposition when used with an object pronoun, I find the conjunction argument useful for its distinction.

She loves me more than him.
If "than" can be both a preposition and a conjunction depending on desire, there are two possible interpretations:

She loves me more than he does.
She loves me more than she loves him.


If we consider "than" only a conjunction in such cases, the use of object pronouns (him) will tell us the example instead can mean only the second interpretation.

Subject pronouns will mean only the first option. = She loves me more than he (does).

All below are correct:

Your dog is cleverer than my dog.
Your dog is cleverer than my dog is.
Your dog is cleverer than mine.
Your dog is cleverer than mine is.
Mordant
Language Coach


Joined: 12 May 2010
Posts: 1964
Location: United States

more clever or cleverer #6 (permalink) Thu May 27, 2010 10:54 am   more clever or cleverer
 

Keefe, the implication is "than X is clever," not "than X is cleverer." It's quite logical. It is understood that you are making a comparison, so what is implied would not invalidate that comparison.

I would actually prefer "more clever," but I like both.
I strongly prefer "more polite," but they're both correct.

There is no rule stating that only three-syllable adjectives take "more." This is no change, either.

More tactful
More graceful
More gauche (Can go both ways.)
More adroit
More adept
More feckless
More helpless
More hopeless
More abject
More aloof
More reckless
More grateful
More thankful
More absurd
More intense
More silent
More vocal
More fervid
More fervent
More complete
More tireless
More tiresome
More boring
More pleasing
Mordant
Language Coach


Joined: 12 May 2010
Posts: 1964
Location: United States

more clever or cleverer #7 (permalink) Thu May 27, 2010 12:02 pm   more clever or cleverer
 

mordant, can't e put (er ) (est) to any of these adjectives ?? or as we like?

you can also add

real

right

wrong

common
_________________
"There is no compulsion in religion; truly the right way has become clearly distinct from error....."

The qur'an 1:256
Ahmeeeeeeeeeed
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 23 May 2010
Posts: 292

more clever or cleverer #8 (permalink) Sun May 30, 2010 8:36 am   more clever or cleverer
 

up
_________________
"There is no compulsion in religion; truly the right way has become clearly distinct from error....."

The qur'an 1:256
Ahmeeeeeeeeeed
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 23 May 2010
Posts: 292

more clever or cleverer #9 (permalink) Wed Jan 12, 2011 11:57 am   more clever or cleverer
 

I have a serious problem with your list of words,

These words are binary Adjectives, are either ARE or ARE NOT true of a target noun.

You cannot be more than someone else in any of them. Hence why you cannot create a comparative or superlative of said nouns.

Take the original word Clever.

mentally bright; having sharp or quick intelligence,

you either have it or you don't. Sure the speed can be compared, the level of intellect can be compared, but the idea of clever is to have it, or not.

hence: not comparative.

all the words in the list, when looked at correctly, have the same properties.

How can someone be more silent? by the mere concept that sound has been emitted, silence ceases to exist. you are either bored by something or you are not, something tires you, pleases you,

The suffix ful = FULL = 100% no comparison,
Less = without = 0 no comparison.

Now, sure, language changes, and concepts of words change, but the origins dictate how we construct the rules, and rules should stay the same so our children can learn from parents and grandparents without too much confusion.
BaneStar
New Member


Joined: 12 Jan 2011
Posts: 2

Re: more clever or cleverer #10 (permalink) Wed Jan 12, 2011 17:35 pm   Re: more clever or cleverer
 

Mordant wrote:
He is cleverer than me. - Wrong
He is cleverer than I. - Correct
He is cleverer than I am. - Correct
[/i]


He is cleverer than I. Academic English

He is cleverer than me. Correct as well. Informal English

Right?
E2e4
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 01 Jan 2011
Posts: 1528

more clever or cleverer #11 (permalink) Wed Jan 12, 2011 18:30 pm   more clever or cleverer
 

Wrong, sorry, E2e4.

The object pronoun is 'me'.
'He is cleverer than me' is correct. Your other sentence is not correct. There is no difference here between academic, formal or informal English.

The subject pronoun is 'I'.
'I am cleverer than him' is correct.
_________________
"Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened."
Terry Pratchett
Beeesneees
Language Coach


Joined: 08 Apr 2010
Posts: 32903
Location: UK, born and bred

more clever or cleverer #12 (permalink) Tue Nov 01, 2011 13:01 pm   more clever or cleverer
 

The pronoun is 'I'. This is because 'is' (the verb 'be') is not a transative verb with an object, but a connecting, linking, or copular verb, with a complement. While it looks like an object, the complement is correctly in the subjective case. Hence, the correct form is "It is I", not "It is me". In the same way, the correct form is "He is cleverer then I" or "He is more clever than I" as you prefer.
Graham.fountain
New Member


Joined: 01 Nov 2011
Posts: 1

Display posts from previous:   
need a vocabulary word. | Questions
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
to come upto find their mojoon/forgroundhog dayclock time wraps around every 12 hoursI would really/I really would?QuestionsWhich is correct?be on callfeel badcomehelp to clarify these sentencesQuestions

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail