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pullover vs. sweater



 
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pullover vs. sweater #1 (permalink) Wed Jan 30, 2008 14:07 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

Hi,

What is the difference between a pullover and a sweater? I the term pullover older than the word sweater?

Thanks,
Torsten

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pullover vs. sweater #2 (permalink) Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:30 am   pullover vs. sweater
 

Torsten wrote:
What is the difference between a pullover and a sweater? I the term pullover older than the word sweater?

A pullover is a type of sweater. It's the type of sweater that you pull over your head, ergo the name. But there are other types of sweaters, such as button-down sweaters, which include cardigan sweaters, and sweater vests. Sweater vests are another type of pullover.

I find that French and German speakers of English use the word "pullover" far too much. We use the word "sweater" almost all the time, and we say "pullover" only when there's some important reason to explain specifically what type of sweater it is.
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pullover vs. sweater #3 (permalink) Fri Feb 01, 2008 17:35 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

Hi Jamie,

Thanks a lot clearing this up. Interestingly enough, many Germans pronounce "sweater" the same way like "sweeter".

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pullover vs. sweater #4 (permalink) Fri Feb 01, 2008 17:56 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

Torsten wrote:
Thanks a lot clearing this up. Interestingly enough, many Germans pronounce "sweater" the same way like "sweeter".

Yes, many people in Central Europe claim that that is the "British" pronunciation, but it's not. It was a lot of work for my colleagues and I to eradicate that from the speech of our students in the Czech Republic, and they always argued with us before they complied.
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pullover vs. sweater #5 (permalink) Fri Feb 01, 2008 18:35 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

There are lots of English words that are used by Germans when speaking German and many of them are pronounced the German way. I remember shortly after reunification a lot of shop assistants at East German electronic stores would pronounce "receiver" like "driver".

Another word frequently mispronounced word is "lounge" which in Germany often sounds like "launch". Incidentally, this morning on the BBC I heard an interview with an East German travel agent from Erfurt. Her company "OssiUrlaub" is offering a new serice: flights for nudist. In opinion this is an insane idea but apparently there are enough hard core nudists who are willing to pay money for a flight where they have to take their clothes off. Anyway, that woman was constantly mispronouncing the word "clothes" and I had to think about your remarks you made here on the forum regarding this mistake.

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pullover vs. sweater #6 (permalink) Fri Feb 01, 2008 20:19 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

Torsten wrote:
What is the difference between a pullover and a sweater? I the term pullover older than the word sweater?
Hi Torsten

Your question reminds me of something else: the word 'jumper'.

I'll never, ever forget the first time my (male) British neighbor told me he was going to put on a 'jumper'. I still clearly remember wondering whether that meant I would be going out to dinner with someone dressed as a drag queen. :lol:

I really had no idea whatsoever what he was actually planning to do until I asked him directly if he was planning to wear a dress. Boy was I ever relieved to find out that he meant 'sweater'! :lol:

British vs American definition of jumper

PS
My British neighbor was also confused when I asked him if he was planning to wear a dress. He had no idea why in the world I'd asked such an odd question. :lol:
.
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pullover vs. sweater #7 (permalink) Fri Feb 01, 2008 20:26 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

Hi Amy,

Thanks for pointing out the difference between UK and US English here. I thought that sweater was pretty American as probably is the term "sweat pants", isn't? I mean, to British ears, "sweat pants" might sound strange since "pants" in UK English are underpants.

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pullover vs. sweater #8 (permalink) Fri Feb 01, 2008 20:50 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

Hi Torsten

I do not claim to be an expert on British English, so you're better off asking a Brit about about whether they'd use the term "sweat pants".

However, based on my experience with various British neighbors and colleagues, it seems to me that 'sweater' (meaning 'pullover') must also be used in BE.

I have also heard that the word 'pants' basically means 'underpants' in BE, but I really don't know whether 'pants' is used exclusively to mean 'underpants' in BE. I can't remember having any misunderstandings resulting from the use of the word 'sweatpants', though.

By the way, I do not really connect the word 'sweater' with the word 'sweatshirt' (or 'sweatpants'). They are two different types of clothing in my mind.

EDIT:
If the Oxford Dictionary is any indication, then it seems that 'sweatpants' is used in both the UK and the US (i.e. there is no notation that 'sweatpants' is only or chiefly a North American word).
http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/sweatpants?view=uk
.
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pullover vs. sweater #9 (permalink) Sat Feb 02, 2008 14:24 pm   pullover vs. sweater
 

Torsten wrote:
I the term pullover older than the word sweater?
According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word "sweater" is slightly older, but neither word is particularly old.
.
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