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Usage of may and might



 
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Usage of may and might #1 (permalink) Fri Apr 25, 2008 5:32 am   Usage of may and might
 

Could You Tell Me What Is The Difference Between May And Might When Used In The Context Of Possibility?
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USAGE OF MAY AND MIGHT #2 (permalink) Fri Apr 25, 2008 6:02 am   USAGE OF MAY AND MIGHT
 

Traditionally, may expresses a stronger possibility than might. I think it's still that way for the majority of speakers.
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Usage of may and might #3 (permalink) Fri Apr 25, 2008 11:26 am   Usage of may and might
 

The difference is in the degree of assurance. May - (you are sure or not sure) 50%, might - less.
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Usage of may and might #4 (permalink) Fri Apr 25, 2008 11:49 am   Usage of may and might
 

I'm afraid it's not as precise as that.

Sometimes, "might" can be just as strong as "may", or stronger. It often depends on stress and intonation.

e.g.

So, do you think you may come tomorrow?

I might, actually. (Can mean "I think I probably will".)
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may and might confusion #5 (permalink) Sat May 15, 2010 18:19 pm   may and might confusion
 

Please I need someone's help to correct me on these grammers. When am I suppose to us may and might in a sentence. Is might singular and may plural. For example, she might help me with some house chores. They may help me with some house chore.

Thanks
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may and might confusion #6 (permalink) Sat May 15, 2010 20:02 pm   may and might confusion
 

Hi,

I thhink you use may only when you will ask for permission, for example, may I use your car? and might when you express a probability or if you are no sure about something. Ex. she might be here.
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Usage of may and might #7 (permalink) Sat May 15, 2010 20:21 pm   Usage of may and might
 

Your confusion is heightened by the fact that the two words are often synonyms for each other and can be used interchangeably.

"I may come tonight. I'll see how I feel."
"I might come tonight. I'll see how I feel." are both correct.
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Usage of may and might #8 (permalink) Sat May 15, 2010 22:47 pm   Usage of may and might
 

May and might both can be used as expectations, like when you are expecting something to come true, or when you are doubtful about something, meaning you are not sure, for example:- "This statement may/might be true."

Also May can be used to ask a permission eg.: "may I use your car?"

Might can also be used when you are preapring to do some task , for eg. "I might as well get rid of these old newspapers."
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Usage of may and might #9 (permalink) Sun May 16, 2010 11:55 am   Usage of may and might
 

Thanks for all your help but I am still confused somewhere. Does that mean I can use them together or which one is more correct.
They may help me out with some house chores or they might help me out with some house chores.

Thanks
Aiphy123
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Usage of may and might #10 (permalink) Sun May 16, 2010 20:06 pm   Usage of may and might
 

Neither is more correct, and you need only one of them.
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may and might confusion #11 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 8:31 am   may and might confusion
 

Aiphy123 wrote:
Please I need someone's help to correct me on these grammers.

Please note that the word 'grammar' is uncountable.

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may and might confusion #12 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 9:08 am   may and might confusion
 

Thank you torsten, I will take note of that
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Usage of may and might #13 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 9:18 am   Usage of may and might
 

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Hi Aiphy123,

I think you need to forget the idea of correctness and concentrate on the idea of whether 'may' is appropriate or 'might' is appropriate in what you want to say.

If you use may/might to suggest what is likely to happen, then it is a question of possibility or probability.

In this sentence: I may come to see you if I have time this evening what you are saying is that there is a possibility that I will come and in that case you can expect me to come as there is a chance.

If I say; I might come to see you if I have time this evening what you are saying is that it isn't really clear whether I can come or not and in that case don't worry if I don't arrive.

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