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More fun vs Funner


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More fun vs Funner #1 (permalink) Tue Apr 29, 2008 4:23 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Hey, this is quickly!
Which is ok, "this is more fun" or "this is funner"?

Thanks a million!
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Sergio M.
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More fun vs Funner #2 (permalink) Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:03 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Only "more fun" is used. People never use "funner". However I have another question relating this topic:

I've read in Mc Millan American English Dictionary for Advanced learner that "fun" can only be used as an attributive, but when I checked it on the BNC, I did find many results in which "fun" is used as a normal adjective. So does the dictionary refer only to American English?
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More fun vs Funner #3 (permalink) Tue Apr 29, 2008 8:43 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Hi

Take a look at the entry for 'fun' as an adjective in the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary here: http://www.onelook.com/?w=fun&ls=a

You will see that the words 'funner' and 'funnest' are indeed used occasionally. However, they sound quite informal to me.

Nessie, are you sure that your dictionary stated that the word 'fun can only be used as an attributive'? :shock:
.
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More fun vs Funner #4 (permalink) Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:25 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Yes, Amy. Here is the whole entry for the word "fun" (adj) in my Mac Millan English Dictionary for Advanced learner of American English:

FUN (adjective) [only before noun]: enjoyable
eg1: scuba diving is a fun thing to do
eg2: a fun day at the zoo

Besides, there is also a notification accompanied with it:

FUNNY is used for talking about something or someone that makes you laugh
=> He told a funny joke
=> She is one of the funniest people I know
=> Don't laugh; it isn't funny
FUN is used for talking about something that is enjoyable or someone that you enjoy being with
=> London is a fun city
=> Our day at the beach was really fun
=> My sister is a fun person

:):):)
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Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
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More fun vs Funner #5 (permalink) Tue Apr 29, 2008 18:08 pm   More fun vs Funner
 

Ok, if it is "more fun", why couldn't that be "funner" if it works as an adj.?
It is just one syllable, isn't? Fun accomplishes the one-two syllable rule, doesn't it?
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More fun vs Funner #6 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 5:14 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Oh, it's just the matter of language using style, Serzige. You must know that not everything in English goes as the rule.
For example, we say "more right" and "more wrong" but not "righter" or "wronger".
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:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
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More fun vs Funner #7 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 6:55 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Quote:
You must know that not everything in English goes as the rule.


Or that some speakers use other rules, as in many English dialects.
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More fun vs Funner #8 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 7:01 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Serzige wrote:
Ok, if it is "more fun", why couldn't that be "funner" if it works as an adj.?
It is just one syllable, isn't? Fun accomplishes the one-two syllable rule, doesn't it?

You're probably thinking of this one: funnier, but it is the comparative form of "funny", not "fun".
Anyway, "fun" is no laughting matter ;)
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More fun vs Funner #9 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 16:03 pm   More fun vs Funner
 

Ok guys. I dare you to watch this interview with Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker...


At 00:33 Tucker clearly says,"funner and funner". So why's that? Maybe you can enlighten us a little bit more.
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Serzige
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More fun vs Funner #10 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 18:16 pm   More fun vs Funner
 

lost_soul wrote:
Serzige wrote:
Ok, if it is "more fun", why couldn't that be "funner" if it works as an adj.?
It is just one syllable, isn't? Fun accomplishes the one-two syllable rule, doesn't it?

You're probably thinking of this one: funnier, but it is the comparative form of "funny", not "fun".
Anyway, "fun" is no laughting matter ;)

Hi Alex
Did you read my first post? And did you look at the Merriam-Webster Dictionary entry for the word 'fun'? Funner and funnest are indeed used sometimes. However, I personally consider the usage of 'funner' and 'funnest' to be slang/non-standard.
.
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More fun vs Funner #11 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 18:28 pm   More fun vs Funner
 

Yankee wrote:
Hi Alex
Did you read my first post? And did you look at the Merriam-Webster Dictionary entry for the word 'fun'? Funner and funnest are indeed used sometimes. However, I personally consider the usage of 'funner' and 'funnest' to be slang/non-standard.
.

Ops, sorry... I thought you wrote "funnier", but now I see it actually is "funner".
At first I deemed "funner" wrong on ground that my dictionary failed to recognize it :) It only contains an entry for "funnier"
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More fun vs Funner #12 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 18:34 pm   More fun vs Funner
 

Ok everything seems great! But nobody has established a period. I just wanna know if it is used as a slang or it is not gramatically correct...Another issue, personally I've never heard someone saying "this is more right" or "this is more wrong", for me those phrases are redundant. Instead of those I'd use expressions like "this is better or worse" and that's it...Probably I'm wrong...
thanks!
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Sergio M.
"Life is too short to grieve in sorrow"
Serzige
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 03 Apr 2006
Posts: 138

More fun vs Funner #13 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 18:37 pm   More fun vs Funner
 

.
I would not use 'funner' or funnest' in a formal context, if that's what you want to know.
.
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
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Posts: 8325
Location: USA

More fun vs Funner #14 (permalink) Wed Apr 30, 2008 23:46 pm   More fun vs Funner
 

Serzige wrote:
...Another issue, personally I've never heard someone saying "this is more right" or "this is more wrong", for me those phrases are redundant. Instead of those I'd use expressions like "this is better or worse" and that's it...Probably I'm wrong...
thanks!

I'd would like nessy to look at this!
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Sergio M.
"Life is too short to grieve in sorrow"
Serzige
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 03 Apr 2006
Posts: 138

More fun vs Funner #15 (permalink) Thu May 01, 2008 7:35 am   More fun vs Funner
 

Sergio, here is what I want to tell you: English knowledge is like an ocean, and do you think you can swim across the ocean? The fact that you have never heard someone say "more right" or "more wrong" doesn't necessarily mean that they don't exist. I just wonder what can make you so self-confident to think so...

For your information, here is examples from the BNC about the usage of "more wrong":

http://sara.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/cgi-bin/saraWeb?qy=more+wrong

And here are some more examples for "more right" (also from the BNC):
- Don't you think that's more right judgement?
- You see you couldn't be more right.
- This does not mean however that some valuations are not more right than others; appreciating at least the following practical points will help make sure that our valuations are `;more right'; than not:
- Here, like this, it's never been more right.
- Couldn't be more right, except that

By the way, it's "Nessie", not "nessy"

P.S: Last but not least, I myself think it is extremely not polite to open a thread of asking questions by saying "Hey, this is quickly!"
And, it is surely not polite to say this to our kind dedicated teachers here: "Ok guys. I dare you to watch this interview with Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker... "
You'd better be more careful with your words!
_________________
:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
Nessie
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 1102

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