Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to go out of sight; to become extinct; to cease to exist; to vanish
disappear
affiliate
entrance
award
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

What is the opposite of yearn?


Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
What is an antonym of jovial? | How can practice homonyms, homphones and synonyms?
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
What is the opposite of yearn? #1 (permalink) Wed May 07, 2008 19:16 pm   What is the opposite of yearn?
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #215 "Antonyms (1)", question 10

Steven was stationed so long in Iraqthat he often yearned to see his wife and children again. What is an antonym of yearn? .........

(a) desire
(b) refuse
(c) long
(d) unite

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #215 "Antonyms (1)", answer 10

Steven was stationed so long in Iraqthat he often yearned to see his wife and children again. What is an antonym of yearn? refuse

Correct answer: (b) refuse
_________________________

Please explain as to why refuse is the answer in here. is there another word that comes close to this answer?

Art
Art
Guest





Refuse #2 (permalink) Wed May 07, 2008 21:29 pm   Refuse
 

Hello,
The definition of "yearn" is: "to long for - persistently, wistfully or sadly; to want something badly."
So, the best answer (an antonym) is "refuse" because the definition is: "to express oneself as unwilling to accept. For example, "to refuse a gift."
_________________
One Way of Learning English Grammar
Learn English with Linda Arlia
Linda
I'm here quite often ;-)
Linda Arlia

Joined: 20 Apr 2006
Posts: 656
Location: Canada

Learn some cool expressions in the following cool storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Sign up for FREE and explore English! Click to subscribe to email English course
refuse to yearn; encourage to dread #3 (permalink) Thu May 08, 2008 11:33 am   refuse to yearn; encourage to dread
 

ForWhatItsWorth, as a native speaker, I fail this test - though not in the multiple choice form. "Refuse" is a poor choice in context but certainly diametrically opposite the others

My choice? Dread. IMHO, Refuse is more appropriate an antonym to accept as dread is to long/yearn.

Steven was stationed so long in Iraq that he often dreaded to see his wife and children again.

This is not the first time I would choose a different antonym. Why do these tests use words that natives would not? There must be a logical answer I do not see.
English Rpg Gm
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Apr 2008
Posts: 18
Location: Warszawa, Poland

Yearn #4 (permalink) Thu May 08, 2008 15:12 pm   Yearn
 

Hi,
I'm a native speaker and I'm not sure what you're referring to when you say we use words that "natives" would not. Are you referring to yearn or refuse? I use both and so do many other people. "Dread" is a good option but the students have to choose the word that is an antonym to yearn and refuse is an antonym of yearn - in my opinion. I think this discussion is a matter of opinion.
You also made a mistake in your speech. Did you mean "I would fail this test" or "I failed this test?" I "fail this test" is not correct.
_________________
One Way of Learning English Grammar
Learn English with Linda Arlia
Linda
I'm here quite often ;-)
Linda Arlia

Joined: 20 Apr 2006
Posts: 656
Location: Canada

I Fail To Refuse #5 (permalink) Thu May 08, 2008 18:46 pm   I Fail To Refuse
 

Hi Linda,

:oops: yeah, well I would fail the test were I to take it. As it is, I fail the test because I do not (even) see the rationale in using the best word available which is obviously supposed to be refuse.* Obvious for me only because all the other words are not even close to antonyms.

"Steven was stationed so long in Iraq that he often refused to see his wife and children again." That does not sound, well, normal to me.

So I am thinking why is a better antonym, such as dread, not an option? It just rolls off the tip of the tongue as a natural antonym to yearn. A student is not about to pencil in a better antonym. But why wasn't a better one provided?

Is the test to emphasize the word refuse/reject at that level? Why not use a more natural context for the verb refuse if such is the case?

I am just curious.

* breaking a rule can be used for emphasis but only after you know the rule, my grade school teacher told me. Also, breaking the rule is acceptable if you're a hillbilly or an American President. :P
English Rpg Gm
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Apr 2008
Posts: 18
Location: Warszawa, Poland

What is the opposite of yearn? #6 (permalink) Thu May 08, 2008 19:04 pm   What is the opposite of yearn?
 

Hi

I agree with English RPG GM that dread would be more appropriate as an antonym for yearn. To me, refuse isn't quite right, and only the fact that the other options are so much "wronger" help a test-taker find the "correct" answer in this test.

Just my two cents.
.
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Yearn #7 (permalink) Thu May 08, 2008 21:25 pm   Yearn
 

Again,
Thanks for the opinions but I think you're failing to understand how this test works. It's really not that difficult but I'll explain it.
The sentence is only given so that the students can see how the first word is used - in context. Then, the students choose an antonym (from the highlighted word used in a sentence) from a list of words. The antonym does not replace the highlighted word in the sentence. I'm glad that dread rolls off of your tongue ever so beautifully. However, I think the word refuse (as an antonym) is fine.
The definition of yearn is: to want something badly
The definition of refuse is: unwilling to accept something
The definition of dread is: "to fear greatly; to feel extreme reluctance to meet or face" - usually with fear
So, that really doesn't make sense at all. Subsequently, although you are yearning for dread, I'm going to have to refuse that request.
_________________
One Way of Learning English Grammar
Learn English with Linda Arlia
Linda
I'm here quite often ;-)
Linda Arlia

Joined: 20 Apr 2006
Posts: 656
Location: Canada

Yearn #8 (permalink) Fri May 09, 2008 1:29 am   Yearn
 

Hi again,
Just so I'm clear. It doesn't make sense to me that refuse wouldn't work in this case (that's what I meant by my latter sentences). Furthermore, there are many other words that would work as antonyms as well. For example, "abhor, detest, dislike." Any one of these - as an antonym of yearn - is just fine.
And again, did you mean to say "I fail to understand this test"....OR "I fail to see why this word was used" because "I fail the test" (unless you repeatedly take the test everyday and fail) is not proper English.
Also, you said "Why do these tests use words that natives would not?" That is not the case - at all - and you didn't respond to the question I posed about that.
By the way, all of my teachers and university professors taught me to use fact and reason to support my views etc. - not insults and/or generalizations. :D
_________________
One Way of Learning English Grammar
Learn English with Linda Arlia
Linda
I'm here quite often ;-)
Linda Arlia

Joined: 20 Apr 2006
Posts: 656
Location: Canada

What is the opposite of yearn? #9 (permalink) Fri May 09, 2008 5:15 am   What is the opposite of yearn?
 

.
To me, both 'yearn' and 'dread' suggest that a good bit of time is spent either feeling that you want (yearn) or do not want (dread) something, and in both cases the feeling is very strong. That's one reason I like English RPG GM's suggestion.

In addition, with the word 'yearn' there is a sense that you want something that it is not possible to have -- at least not right away. On the other hand, the word 'dread' suggests that the person is anticipating that what they don't want to happen is going to happen. So, that suggests opposite to me.

The word 'refuse' just doesn't quite make it as an antonym for 'yearn' -- at least not to me. I also think that 'refuse' and 'accept' make much better antonyms.
.
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

What is the opposite of yearn? #10 (permalink) Fri May 09, 2008 5:24 am   What is the opposite of yearn?
 

.
Refuse is not a good antonym for yearn. I would replace it with dread or something else that includes the idea of the opposite emotion: loathe, repulse, spurn, etc.
.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13014

The Tongue Of Dread or Dread Nought #11 (permalink) Fri May 09, 2008 6:48 am   The Tongue Of Dread or Dread Nought
 

Linda wrote:
Again,
Thanks for the opinions but I think you're failing to understand how this test works.
Countinuously, ...or repeatedly. Since I am a native speaker, students often come to me with exactly these questions and from such multiple choice tests from such diverse sources as Cambridge (publisher), British Council, etc. I have to say choose "refuse." Like Mr. Micawber, the antonym refuse does not suggest the emotion behind the decision and InMyHunbleOpinion fails to represent the opposite of yearn as a result.
Linda wrote:
It's really not that difficult but I'll explain it.
The sentence is only given so that the students can see how the first word is used - in context. Then, the students choose an antonym (from the highlighted word used in a sentence) from a list of words. The antonym does not replace the highlighted word in the sentence.
Then I have to wonder why a word better than refuse was not used as the antonym to teach the student the verb yearn.

Am I nit picking? Maybe. Still, I am astounded at the vocabulary deficiencies I see in my groups - and I specialize in proficiency-level conversation.
Linda wrote:
I'm glad that dread rolls off of your tongue ever so beautifully.
:lol: I JUST LIKE THE WAY THAT SOUNDS :twisted: muuuuwaaahahaha
Linda wrote:
However, I think the word refuse (as an antonym) is fine.
The definition of yearn is: to want something badly
The definition of refuse is: unwilling to accept something
The definition of dread is: "to fear greatly; to feel extreme reluctance to meet or face" - usually with fear
So, that really doesn't make sense at all.
Ok, in the opinion game I cannot deny you your opinion. But I am not really in an argument about that. I am trying to learn why these test designs are not more emcompassing. I don't think I would be a good teacher if I did not learn myself.
Linda wrote:
Subsequently, although you are yearning for dread, I'm going to have to refuse that request.

Hi again,
Just so I'm clear. It doesn't make sense to me that refuse wouldn't work in this case (that's what I meant by my latter sentences). Furthermore, there are many other words that would work as antonyms as well. For example, "abhor, detest, dislike." Any one of these - as an antonym of yearn - is just fine.
And again, did you mean to say "I fail to understand this test"....OR "I fail to see why this word was used" because "I fail the test" (unless you repeatedly take the test everyday and fail) is not proper English.

Please see above.
Linda wrote:
Also, you said "Why do these tests use words that natives would not?" That is not the case - at all - and you didn't respond to the question I posed about that.
Well, we natives do use the word refuse so let me publicly lay that bugaboo to rest and assuage student fears. Refuse is a word in current usage in the English language, used for Scrabble according to Chambers dictionary. (Students: Chambers 20th Century Dictionary is the best dictionary you will ever buy!)

Linda wrote:
By the way, all of my teachers and university professors taught me to use fact and reason to support my views etc. - not insults and/or generalizations.
:D
I find humour works well also, but that's my advertising background for ya.

The original question I posed may not be answerable by us civilians. However, I have noticed words that are "weak" taught to students on these multiple choice exams and I was/am wondering if there is a logical explanation for it. The question should be directed to the publishers of these so called exams who make the decisions and/or anyone "in the know."

In my opinion, I would add an (e) dread to the test. I would also not make it so easy to guess the answer in a "one of these things is not like the other..." fashion, FWIW.
English Rpg Gm
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Apr 2008
Posts: 18
Location: Warszawa, Poland

Yearn #12 (permalink) Fri May 09, 2008 14:54 pm   Yearn
 

Hi,
Thanks for all of the opinions but I think the word should be changed to "abhor" instead. I like that better. :D But, I still think that the word "refuse" is fine.
As far as the other comments (such as the one made about not using "refuse" in everyday language), I'd like to respond by saying that people still use the word "refuse" whether you say they do or not.
I'm also still curious about why you have now dodged the question about your improper grammar (that you used and then defended until your last comments). I, as a native speaker, wouldn't have defended grammar like that - it's elementary. As you stated, you wouldn't be a good teacher if you fail to use proper grammar when speaking or writing.
Lastly, you're entitled to your opinions about the tests and the English language - as am I. By the way, I wouldn't call it "nit picking" - I, as a native speaker, would call it "splitting hairs." I like the way that sounds. :wink:
I now have to get back to work.
_________________
One Way of Learning English Grammar
Learn English with Linda Arlia
Linda
I'm here quite often ;-)
Linda Arlia

Joined: 20 Apr 2006
Posts: 656
Location: Canada

Antonyms; Angels on Heads of Pins; and The Antonym of Yearn #13 (permalink) Fri May 09, 2008 21:14 pm   Antonyms; Angels on Heads of Pins; and The Antonym of Yearn
 

Linda wrote:
As far as the other comments (such as the one made about not using "refuse" in everyday language), I'd like to respond by saying that people still use the word "refuse" whether you say they do or not.
Of course, refuse is still used. Are you taking the Michael on me/us? :?
Me, written just below wrote:
Well, we natives do use the word refuse so let me publicly lay that bugaboo to rest and assuage student fears. Refuse is a word in current usage in the English language, used for Scrabble according to Chambers dictionary. (Students: Chambers 20th Century Dictionary is the best dictionary you will ever buy!)
Linda wrote:
I'm also still curious about why you have now dodged the question about your improper grammar (that you used and then defended until your last comments).
Precisely because I am a native speaker I fail this test; and I have been failing it since before this thread was started. I first failed it when a student came up with an odd-ball sentence which I corrected and then had to hear: "That's not how it was on the test." So grammatically, yes, I am correct. I do fail this test. Willfully. Repeatedly. :roll: (My apologies to hillbillies everywhere.) As a native speaker, it is my job to fail this test so that my students do not get quizzical stares or laughs when they express themselves properly in public. :wink:

My question is why are students given such odd choices on tests? (My sympathies if you designed this test - I am not intentionally picking on you but I can understand how the originator of this exam may feel uncomfortable with my criticism.) I am questioning and challenging the authority of the test.

This one example is not the only one I have seen, and they come from reputable sources as I have mentioned previous. This is but one example. The scary part is there are many other examples, all spuriously palmed off to students.
English Rpg Gm
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Apr 2008
Posts: 18
Location: Warszawa, Poland

What is the opposite of yearn? #14 (permalink) Fri May 09, 2008 22:52 pm   What is the opposite of yearn?
 

Hi,

You repeatedly tell us that you are a native speaker. Where did you grow up and learn/acquire your English?

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16390
Location: UK

R.A. Whipple #15 (permalink) Sat May 10, 2008 6:02 am   R.A. Whipple
 

Hi Alan,

I am an anglophone Canadian from Quebec, Canada.

Sorry about my anonymous nickname: English RPG GM. I use it as a little self-promotion here of how I do what I do in Poland. I give conversation practice using role playing games. My market is proficiency-level speakers. My proper name is R.A. Whipple.

This is about me from my website; and on my LinkedIn profile.

Academically, I studied British literature at UPEI in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, before going into business in Montreal. I opened a second office in Toronto, Ontario, serving national clients. I found myself in Warsaw, Poland 7 years ago.

Experience-wise, I am a public relations counselor: spokesperson, news release writer, media/presentations trainer.

I am also dyslexic so my apologies for the typos I may have missed. You have quite a remarkable site here, Alan.
English Rpg Gm
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Apr 2008
Posts: 18
Location: Warszawa, Poland

Display posts from previous:   
What is an antonym of jovial? | How can practice homonyms, homphones and synonyms?
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
meaning of "way up"In the open air means 'outside'?difference between make and doWhat is a game plan?What is the diffrence between reconcile and fit?meaning of dumbWhat is the difference between "blow up" and "blow off"?what is ditch water?The annual depreciation expense recorded for the third year using the double...What is the opposite of yearn?, page 2he kept to himself - what does it mean?idiom: to keep to oneselfWhat does dwell mean?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail