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"Get over it" vs "Get it over with"



 
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ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
unreasonable large | Reported speech: The mother accused her son of not having done what she had said
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"Get over it" vs "Get it over with" #1 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 17:27 pm   "Get over it" vs "Get it over with"
 

Hi

Could you please tell me if the following carry the same meaning?

Quote:
Get over it.

Get it over with.


Many thanks,
Tom
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2139

"Get over it" vs "Get it over with" #2 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:51 pm   "Get over it" vs "Get it over with"
 

They don't mean the same thing.

"Get over it," means to reconcile oneself with "it" emotionally.
"Her mother died when she was 10, and she never got over it."
"Some people adjust well after divorce, but some people never get over it."


You can also use "get over it" with illnesses.
"He had the flu, but he got over it in a couple of days.

"Get it over with," means to carry out "it" (usually some unpleasant task or obligation) so that it's behind you and you don't have to do it later or continue to worry about it.
"I'm afraid to tell the boss about my mistake." "Just do it now. Once you get it over with, you'll feel better."
"I do my homework as soon as I come home on Friday. That way I get it over with and have the whole weekend for fun."
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6761
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

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unreasonable large | Reported speech: The mother accused her son of not having done what she had said
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