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"attender" vs "attendee"



 
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"attender" vs "attendee" #1 (permalink) Wed Jun 18, 2008 17:10 pm   "attender" vs "attendee"
 

Hi,

What's the difference between "attender" and "attendee"?

Many thanks.
Nessie.
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"attender" vs "attendee" #2 (permalink) Wed Jun 18, 2008 17:57 pm   "attender" vs "attendee"
 

To my ear, "attendee" is better.

Both mean "one who attends, one who is in attendance, one who attended" etc.

If you want to give the root some Latin flair, try this on for size:

Attendiero (male attendee)
Attendiera (female attendee)

hehe

Quite frankly... I'm trying to remember the last time I heard or read -- aside from this thread -- the word "attender". I cannot recall the instance.

That doesn't mean it isn't used, just that it's not common in my experience.
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"attender" vs "attendee" #3 (permalink) Wed Jun 18, 2008 18:57 pm   "attender" vs "attendee"
 

Hi Nessie,

In addition to Tom's answer you might want to read attender vs. attendee.

Regards,
Torsten

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"attender" vs "attendee" #4 (permalink) Wed Jun 18, 2008 19:17 pm   "attender" vs "attendee"
 

yah, that page throws "attendant" into the mix -- "attendant" is often used in a completely different capacity... as in "flight attendant", as Torsten noted.

For instance, a flight attendant is an airline employee who serves (ostensibly, anyway, it's what they're supposed to do) a flight's customers.
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"attender" vs "attendee" #5 (permalink) Fri Jun 20, 2008 17:51 pm   "attender" vs "attendee"
 

Thanks a lot, Prezbucky and Torsten :)

Hi Prezbucky,
I think I've found out the reason you don't often hear "attender" :P Here is what I see in the OALD:

attender
(especially BrE) (AmE usually attendee) noun a person who goes to a place or an event, often on a regular basis: She's a regular attender at evening classes.

:P:P
_________________
:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
Nessie
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 1102

"attender" vs "attendee" #6 (permalink) Fri Jun 20, 2008 18:02 pm   "attender" vs "attendee"
 

By the way, I also want you to have a look at these

ATTENDER:

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary:
attender
(especially BrE) (AmE usually attendee) noun a person who goes to a place or an event, often on a regular basis: She's a regular attender at evening classes. PowerExif - the best choice to edit EXIF data in imagesLongman Dictionary of Contemporary English

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:
attender
atĚtendĚer /əˈtendə US -ər/ n [C]
someone who regularly goes to an event such as a meeting or a class
 Daniel was a regular attender at the Baptist Church.

ATTENDEE:
(only found in Longman, no result in OALD)
attendee
atĚtenĚdee /əˌtenˈdiː, ˌŠten-/ n [C]
someone who is at an event such as a meeting or a course

=> So, I've just come to a conclusion:
1/ Both "attender" and "attendee" have the meaning of "someone who REGULARLY goes to a place, such as a meeting or a class
2/ "attender" is BrE and "attendee" is AmE
3/ only "attendee" has the meaning of "someone who is at an event such as a meeting or a course" (not regularly - not refering to a habit - just refering to the person who is at the event at the moment of speaking)
4/ If both 2 and 3 are right, I just wonder what the BrE substitude for "attendee" is.

Please give me a check
Thank you very much.
Nessie.
_________________
:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
Nessie
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 1102

"attender" vs "attendee" #7 (permalink) Sat Jun 21, 2008 18:56 pm   "attender" vs "attendee"
 

Hi,
Could you please give me a check?

Many thanks
Nessie
_________________
:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
Nessie
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 1102

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