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'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'



 
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'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...' #1 (permalink) Sat Jun 28, 2008 16:50 pm   'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'
 

Hi,

Is there any difference among "intention to do sth", "intention of doing sth" and "intention that..."?

I think there must be because I've read this grammar note in the Longman Dictionary:

GRAMMAR
!! Do not say 'have no intention to do something' or 'not have the slightest intention to do something'. Say have no intention of doing something or not have the slightest intention of doing something : He had no intention of paying me the money.
!! Do not say 'with the intention to do something'. Say with the intention of doing something : He left Manchester with the intention of finding a job in London.

However I still have no idea about when to use which.
Please shed some light on this.

Many thanks
Nessie :)
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'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...' #2 (permalink) Sat Jun 28, 2008 21:49 pm   'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'
 

I think you are right and 'have no intention of doing something' is like fixed idiomatic phrase.
Haihao
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'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...' #3 (permalink) Mon Jun 30, 2008 15:40 pm   'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'
 

Thanks a lot, Haihao :)

But why do you think I'm right? I don't remember stating any ideas that "have no intention of doing sth" is a fixed expression. Please have a look at this:

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary:

intention
noun
[C, U] ~ (of doing sth)
~ (to do sth)
~ (that ...) what you intend or plan to do; your aim: I have no intention of going to the wedding. ◆ He has announced his intention to retire. ◆ It was not my intention that she should suffer. ◆ He left England with the intention of travelling in Africa. ◆ I have every intention of paying her back what I owe her. ◆ The original intention was to devote three months to the project. ◆ She's full of good intentions but they rarely work out. ◆ I did it with the best (of) intentions (= meaning to help), but I only succeeded in annoying them.

***************

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:

intention
inĚtenĚtion
W2 /ɪnˈtenʃən/ n [U and C]
a plan or desire to do something
→intend
have no/every intention of doing sth
 I have no intention of retiring just yet.
 They went into town with the intention of visiting the library.
intention to do sth
 It is our intention to be the number one distributor of health products.
good intentions/the best (of) intentions
(=intentions to do something good or kind, especially when you do not succeed in doing it)
 He thinks the Minister is full of good intentions which won't be carried out.
→ well-intentioned
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GRAMMAR
!! Do not say 'have no intention to do something' or 'not have the slightest intention to do something'. Say have no intention of doing something or not have the slightest intention of doing something : He had no intention of paying me the money.
!! Do not say 'with the intention to do something'. Say with the intention of doing something : He left Manchester with the intention of finding a job in London.
_________________
:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
Nessie
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Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 1102

'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...' #4 (permalink) Tue Jul 01, 2008 8:57 am   'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'
 

Sorry for that long post, everybody :)

But in a nutshell, is there any difference among "intention to do something", "intention of doing something" and "intention that"?
Please help.
Many thanks in advance
Nessie.
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:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
Nessie
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Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 1102

'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...' #5 (permalink) Tue Jul 01, 2008 9:16 am   'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'
 

Hi,

In your examples I think you have to see the uses of 'intention' in examples. Mostly 'intention' is used in the negative sense and followed by 'ing' forms as in: I have no intention of continuing this discussion any further. You wouldn't use this construction with the infinitive but you could use it with the verb 'be' in this way: It isn't my intention to continue ....

Alan
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'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...' #6 (permalink) Tue Jul 01, 2008 18:48 pm   'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'
 

How about this:

It is my intention to do...
My intention is to do...

It is not my intention to do...
I have no intention of doing... - more emphatic in its negativity than "It is not my intention to do..."

*I have intention -- not used

Can you think of exceptions to this?
Barb_D
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'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...' #7 (permalink) Wed Jul 02, 2008 7:20 am   'intention to do sth' vs 'intention of doing sth' vs 'intention that...'
 

Thanks a lot, Alan and Barb :)
From Alan's explanation, I think these can't be used, can they:

- It isn't my intention of doing that.
- I have no intention to continue this discussion any further.

Hi Barb,
What about this:

- I have an intention/the intention to do/of doing...
_________________
:(... something we never have again, I know... I guess I really really know.. :(

Sorry seems to be the hardest word...
Nessie
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 1102

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