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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'



 
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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #1 (permalink) Wed Aug 20, 2008 10:02 am   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Which one is correct? and why?

I haven't yet received your documents as at to date.
I haven't yet received your documents as at today.
I haven't yet received your documents as at todate.
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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #2 (permalink) Wed Aug 20, 2008 10:11 am   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Hi,

I would suggest: As of today I haven't (yet) received your documents

or

To date I haven't (yet) received your documents.

I think you can omit 'yet' in both sentences.

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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #3 (permalink) Sat Aug 23, 2008 15:12 pm   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Hi Alan,
Alan wrote:
Hi,

I would suggest: As of today I haven't (yet) received your documents


What's the meaning and function of 'as of' here?

Alan wrote:
To date I haven't (yet) received your documents.


Does 'to date' here mean the same as 'today', Alan?

Many thanks
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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #4 (permalink) Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:15 am   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Hi,

'As of today' means up till today and so does 'to date'. They are both used to indicate that something has or has not happened up till the present time/ present day.

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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #5 (permalink) Wed Aug 27, 2008 0:10 am   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

According to the dictionary, [as of/as from] is used to show the time or date from which something starts
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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #6 (permalink) Wed Aug 27, 2008 1:08 am   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Hi Sitifan

The expression 'as of' can mean 'on', 'at' or 'from':
Webster's Dictionary: as of
"used to indicate a time or date at which something begins or ends"

The expression 'as of' is frequently used to refer to the point in time when something begins. To me, that is more or less the same sense as 'from'.

However, the use of this expression to mean 'at' can be viewed as 'at this specified time', and thus you might talk, for example, about something which ended at a specified time, or about something which has or has not yet happened up until the specified time, or you might talk about something that started at the specified time in the past, or you might talk about something that will start at the specified time in the future.
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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #7 (permalink) Thu Aug 28, 2008 15:25 pm   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Hi Amy,
Quote:
"used to indicate a time or date at which something begins or ends"

=> But how can we know when to use the expression with which meaning, Amy?

Quote:
However, the use of this expression to mean 'at' can be viewed as 'at this specified time', and thus you might talk, for example, about something which ended at a specified time, or about something which has or has not yet happened up until the specified time, or you might talk about something that started at the specified time in the past, or you might talk about something that will start at the specified time in the future.

(Same query for this)
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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #8 (permalink) Thu Aug 28, 2008 23:20 pm   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Hi Nessie

Here are some examples:

- The new law is in effect as of today.
- As of last Friday, we had received 145 applications.
- As of September 26, 2008, we will no longer be accepting applications.
- As of September 29, 2008, we will be interviewing applicants.
.
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'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate' #9 (permalink) Fri Aug 29, 2008 10:20 am   'to date' vs 'today' vs 'todate'
 

Thank you so much for your very clear-cut examples, Amy :P
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