Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
marketing; activities associated with selling a product or service
instance
sales
series
motivation
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Meaning of slang 'kinda' and the way to use it?



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Grammar question: The meaning of life, then, is to leave behind not only... | handgame 'rock-paper-scissors'
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Meaning of slang 'kinda' and the way to use it? #1 (permalink) Thu Aug 28, 2008 12:39 pm   Meaning of slang 'kinda' and the way to use it?
 

i have some problems in english and i think you can help me
# first , i dont know the meaning of this slang " kinda" and the way to use it n is "kinda " the same as "kindda"?
# second , solution + to s.t , but i saw solution + for , what is correct ? and is solution +for + CLAUSE ?
# third , can u give me the way to use " up to" , "until"
n finally , can u tell me the difference among "like" , "alike", "such" , "such a" , "as" , " such as"
...thanks for reading... :D
khanh
Khanh1994
New Member


Joined: 28 Aug 2008
Posts: 1

Meaning of slang 'kinda' and the way to use it? #2 (permalink) Thu Aug 28, 2008 13:36 pm   Meaning of slang 'kinda' and the way to use it?
 

.
#1-- 'Kinda' is just a way of transcribing the informal pronunciation of the phrase 'kind of'. It is the way many speakers pronounce it in casual conversation.

#2-- I have found the solution to/for the problem. To is more common, but for is OK, too. A noun clause can be used as an object of either preposition.

#3--
up to
a. as far as or approaching (a certain part, degree, point, etc.): She went wading up to her knees. I am up to the eighth lesson.
b. in full realization or attainment of: He worked up to president of the company.
c. as many as; to the limit of: The car will seat up to five persons.
d. having adequate powers or ability for; capable of; equal to: He didn't think I was up to the job.
e. the duty or responsibility of; incumbent upon: It's up to you to break the news to him.
f. engaged in; contriving; doing: What have you been up to lately?


until
–conjunction
1. up to the time that or when; till: He read until his guests arrived.
2. before (usually used in negative constructions): They did not come until the meeting was half over.
–preposition
3. onward to or till (a specified time or occurrence): She worked until 6 p.m.
4. before (usually used in negative constructions): He did not go until night.


#4-- They are used in various constructions too numerous to mention here (or to think of at the moment). Here are some:

Tom looks like Harry.
Tom and Harry look alike.
Mary likes such fellows as Tom and Harry.
Mary likes such a fellow as Tom.
Mary likes a fellow such as Tom.
Mary likes Harry as a friend.
.

_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13015

Learn to use the present simple with the help of this short storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Read these English anecdotes and maybe smile today? Subscribe to free email English course
Display posts from previous:   
Grammar question: The meaning of life, then, is to leave behind not only... | handgame 'rock-paper-scissors'
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
'terminology' vs 'jargon'?usage of "bear"Phrase 'The show was a fiasco...'What does "should I just keep chasing pavements" mean?Writing big number: 203.407.143.000Transformation: The firm is going to raise everybody's salary (Given)Gap-filling exercise: British television is the big success story of post-war...Is it correct to say: "I don't think so he will come."Any difference between "simple past" and "past simple"?'by end of October' vs 'by the end of October'use of 'look like'The meaning of it"The File hasn't been changed" - does this mean, we haven't changed it!

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail