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Difference between contents and ingredients



 
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Difference between contents and ingredients #1 (permalink) Sun Apr 10, 2005 16:56 pm   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

Test No. incompl/inter-12 "At the Restaurant", question 6

If you're really interested, I'm sure the chef will tell you the ......... of that dish.

(a) ingredients
(b) contents
(c) make-up
(d) composition

Test No. incompl/inter-12 "At the Restaurant", answer 6

If you're really interested, I'm sure the chef will tell you the ingredients of that dish.

Correct answer: (a) ingredients

Your answer was: incorrect
If you're really interested, I'm sure the chef will tell you the contents of that dish.
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What's deffence between contents and ingredients? Why word ingredients in this sentence is correct?
Phuong Lam
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Difference between contents and ingredients #2 (permalink) Sun Apr 10, 2005 17:42 pm   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

Contents would be for what is inside a book or a box/package. Ingredients for the things you need to make a meal.
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Difference between contents and ingredients #3 (permalink) Mon Sep 18, 2006 20:52 pm   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

And what about a sandwich? How is it right to say: the contents of the sandwich or the ingredients of a sandwich???
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Filling #4 (permalink) Mon Sep 18, 2006 21:06 pm   Filling
 

Hi Natzin

The British Sandwich Association defines a sandwich as:

"Any form of bread with a filling, generally assembled cold - to include traditional wedge sandwiches, as well as filled rolls, baguettes, pitta, bloomers, wraps, bagels and the like, but not burgers and other products assembled and consumed hot. Hot eating sandwiches are also included." :D

Amy
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Difference between contents and ingredients #5 (permalink) Mon Sep 18, 2006 21:20 pm   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

Hi Yankee :wink:

Thank you very much for the quick reply, but I'm still missing the correct word (may be because I'm just stupid :roll: ) is it "ingredient" or "contents" ???
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Difference between contents and ingredients #6 (permalink) Mon Sep 18, 2006 22:41 pm   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

Hi

The British Sandwich Association uses neither "ingredients" nor "contents", but rather "filling"!

Various dictionaries also say that what's in between the two pieces of bread of a sandwich is called "filling".

If you want to refer to more than what is in between the two pieces of bread (in other words, everything that makes up the sandwich - including the bread), then you might be able to say "ingredients". I myself would say "sandwich fixings" in that case. ;)

Amy
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Difference between contents and ingredients #7 (permalink) Mon Sep 18, 2006 23:06 pm   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

Well, this is I must say, the best possible answer! Thank you very much for your thorough answer! I owe you one, :wink:
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Difference between contents and ingredients #8 (permalink) Sun Jul 19, 2009 21:33 pm   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

hi yankee
thanx for your explanations but just one point :according to your explanations when a sandwich serves hot everything that makes up it,is called ingredients but after a period of time when the same sandwich got cold everything that makes up it is called filling!!!!! :!: :?:
I'm in a muddle please correct me if I'm wrong thanx in advance :)
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Difference between contents and ingredients #9 (permalink) Mon Jul 20, 2009 3:40 am   Difference between contents and ingredients
 

'Heterogeneous and homogeneous' may be the difference between content/filling and ingrdients. best of luck, nanucbe
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