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"I am looking forward to see you."



 
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ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Articles before names | What is the predicate in this sentence?
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"I am looking forward to see you." #1 (permalink) Wed Apr 13, 2005 21:00 pm   "I am looking forward to see you."
 

Are there any British on this forum? If so, do you have any opinion as to whether the sentence above is grammatically correct?
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I'm looking forward to seeing you #2 (permalink) Wed Apr 13, 2005 21:17 pm   I'm looking forward to seeing you
 

The correct phrase is I'm looking forward to seeing you.

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"I am looking forward to see you." #3 (permalink) Fri Apr 15, 2005 9:32 am   "I am looking forward to see you."
 

to is a preposition

after a preposition the -ing form is used

I'm used to cycling in Dublin.
Michael
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Looking forward #4 (permalink) Sat Apr 30, 2005 3:38 am   Looking forward
 

It is good to say 'I expect to see you' or 'to meet you'
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"I am looking forward to see you." #5 (permalink) Tue Jun 21, 2011 11:14 am   "I am looking forward to see you."
 

Michael says:to is a preposition

after a preposition the -ing form is used

I'm used to cycling in Dublin.
Hi Sir Torsten,
Please explain that point a bit more with some examples ?
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"I am looking forward to see you." #6 (permalink) Fri Jun 24, 2011 18:55 pm   "I am looking forward to see you."
 

"I look forward to seeing from you" should be OK as well.
E2e4
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"I am looking forward to see you." #7 (permalink) Fri Jun 24, 2011 21:17 pm   "I am looking forward to see you."
 

E2e4 wrote:
"I look forward to seeing from you" should be OK as well.
Sorry, E234, the preposition 'from' is wrong in combination with the verb 'see' in that sentence. However, you can use additional prepositions in sentences such as the following, for example:

- I look forward to hearing from you.
- I'm looking forward to graduating from college.
- I look forward to working with you.
- I'm looking forward to going on our company picnic this weekend.

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"The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you can see." ~ Winston Churchill
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"I am looking forward to see you." #8 (permalink) Fri Jun 24, 2011 21:42 pm   "I am looking forward to see you."
 

Attai Khan wrote:
Michael says:to is a preposition

after a preposition the -ing form is used
The word 'to' can be part of an infinitive, or it can be used as a preposition.

When a verb follows a preposition, we generally use a gerund (the -ING form of the verb). A gerund acts like a noun in a sentence. Here are some examples:

- These classes are perfect for developing communication skills.
- He completed the test without making any mistakes.
- I'm interested in trying new things.
- She's very good at cooking.

When you use the phrasal verb 'look forward to', the word 'to' is a preposition. Thus, you can use either a noun or a gerund (-ing form of a verb) after the word 'to':

- We're looking forward to the picnic. (The preposition 'to' is followed by a noun.)
- We're looking forward to going on the picnic. (The preposition 'to' is followed by a gerund.)

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"I am looking forward to see you." #9 (permalink) Fri Jun 24, 2011 23:03 pm   "I am looking forward to see you."
 

Esl_Expert wrote:
E2e4 wrote:
"I look forward to seeing from you" should be OK as well.
Sorry, E234, the preposition 'from' is wrong in combination with the verb 'see' in that sentence. However, you can use additional prepositions in sentences such as the following, for example:
_____________________________________________________
"The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you can see." ~ Winston Churchill

Actually I wrote the sentence using "hearing" after which I got conscious that "seeing" had been used in the original sentence.
Then I changed "hearing" to "seeing" making an oversight by way of leaving the preposition from in my sentence.

Of course it is not needed there.
E2e4
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