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I was graduated vs I graduated



 
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All kinds of sport in English | Can I say I am impatient to ask someone for something?
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I was graduated vs I graduated #1 (permalink) Tue Nov 04, 2008 12:18 pm   I was graduated vs I graduated
 

Hi,

I heard someone with excellent command of English said "I was graduated from...". I have the impression this is incorrect so I am a little confused. Can we actually say this?

Many thanks,
Cantik
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I was graduated vs I graduated #2 (permalink) Tue Nov 04, 2008 13:10 pm   I was graduated vs I graduated
 

Hi Cantik

The passive "I was graduated from" version is old-fashioned. It is not used nearly as often as the active "I graduated from" version. The American Heritage Dictionary provides good usage information and background about the verb "graduate":
Quote:
The verb graduate has denoted the action of conferring an academic degree or diploma since at least 1421. Accordingly, the action of receiving a degree should be expressed in the passive, as in She was graduated from Yale in 1998. This use is still current, if old-fashioned, and is acceptable to 78 percent of the Usage Panel. In general usage, however, it has largely yielded to the much more recent active pattern (first attested in 1807): She graduated from Yale in 1998. Eighty-nine percent of the Panel accepts this use. It has the advantage of ascribing the accomplishment to the student, rather than to the institution, which is usually appropriate in discussions of individual students. When the institution's responsibility is emphasized, however, the older pattern may still be recommended. A sentence such as The university graduated more computer science majors in 1997 than in the entire previous decade stresses the university's accomplishment, say, of its computer science program. On the other hand, the sentence More computer science majors graduated in 1997 than in the entire previous decade implies that the class of 1997 was in some way a remarkable group. •The Usage Panel feels quite differently about the use of graduate to mean “to receive a degree from,” as in She graduated Yale in 1998. Seventy-seven percent object to this usage.


http://www.bartleby.com/61/46/G0214600.html
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I was graduated vs I graduated #3 (permalink) Tue Nov 04, 2008 13:52 pm   I was graduated vs I graduated
 

Oh, thanks Amy. Now I know it was just my ignorance. :oops:
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Thou shalt not use yours to make the whole world jealous.
SiCantikManis
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 242

I was graduated vs I graduated #4 (permalink) Tue Nov 04, 2008 15:06 pm   I was graduated vs I graduated
 

Quote:
Now I know it was just my ignorance.

Not at all, Cantik! You've probably always heard/read the version of that sentence that is typical in modern English -- and that's the active version. Your question was a perfectly valid one.
.
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

I was graduated vs I graduated #5 (permalink) Tue Nov 04, 2008 15:10 pm   I was graduated vs I graduated
 

Thanks again, Amy. I am so glad I asked. :)
_________________
Thou shalt not use yours to make the whole world jealous.
SiCantikManis
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 242

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