Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
force of movement; strength or motivation derived from an initial effort
attempt
momentum
majority
courtesy
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

a noun complement?



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Construction: Meaning of When it comes down to it | Hill-like?
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
a noun complement? #1 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 15:26 pm   a noun complement?
 

Mr Alan has written about the articles: ''a'', ''an'' that they should be used:
''With a noun complement, including names of professions. She is a doctor, he became a famous actor."
1.Does ,,a noun complement'' mean ''an adjective before'' a noun?
2.Is it necessary to write ''a'' before Mr, Ms? or can I omit ''a'' as in this post writing Mr Alan?
Thanks for help!
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1481

a noun complement? #2 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 16:39 pm   a noun complement?
 

Hi, I hope this will help.

"Be" and "become" are linking verbs. Any part of speech that follows these verbs is complement.
She is beautiful. "Beautiful" is an adj complement
She is a doctor. "Doctor" is a noun complement.

Alan is a proper noun. You can only use the or number before a proper noun. Besides, after titles such as Mr., Ms., etc., we should use surnames or full names.
Theresa
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Apr 2008
Posts: 27
Location: Vietnam

Do you know how to use the relative pronoun?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!This newsletter tells you all about English! Subscribe to free email English course
a noun complement? #3 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 17:43 pm   a noun complement?
 

Is it necessary to write ''a'' before Mr, Ms? or can I omit ''a'' as in this post writing Mr Alan?

No, it isn't needed. ............... However in speaking, one could say,

" I'm searching for a Mr. Smith".
_________________
Keep it simple ... Keep it interesting.
Kitosdad
Language Coach


Joined: 04 Mar 2009
Posts: 13510
Location: ESSEN, Germany, (but English.)

a noun complement? #4 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 17:45 pm   a noun complement?
 

Theresa, could you please offer more clarification.?
_________________
Keep it simple ... Keep it interesting.
Kitosdad
Language Coach


Joined: 04 Mar 2009
Posts: 13510
Location: ESSEN, Germany, (but English.)

a noun complement? #5 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 17:46 pm   a noun complement?
 

Hi, Theresa. Thank you for your help! So a complement concerns only two verbs: be and become, not any/all verbs?
But Alan has written that I can write''a'' before Mr, Ms, don't you agree with it?
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1481

a noun complement? #6 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 17:57 pm   a noun complement?
 

It's because you don't know that Smith. There is probably more than one Smith in the room. One of the meanings of "a" is one.
There are lots of linking verbs. "Be" and "become" are a case in point.
Theresa
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Apr 2008
Posts: 27
Location: Vietnam

a noun complement? #7 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 19:37 pm   a noun complement?
 

Please tell me clearly, if Alan has written: ''With a noun complement, including names of professions. She is a doctor, he became a famous actor'', did he meant that ,,famous'' is a complement of noun ,,actor'' in this sentence?
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1481

a noun complement? #8 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 21:17 pm   a noun complement?
 

Saneta wrote:
Please tell me clearly, if Alan has written: ''With a noun complement, including names of professions. She is a doctor, he became a famous actor'', did he meant that ,,famous'' is a complement of noun ,,actor'' in this sentence?


1)
a famous actor

'famous' is an adjective describing the noun complement 'actor'.

Notice that we have moved the article 'a' before the adjective 'famous'.

2)
article usage

Also, the pronunciation of that adjective would then decide what article to use, for example, we would say -- a famous actor INSTEAD OF an famous actor.
_________________
First lesson - English, not english. I, not i. ~A student of English
Gray
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 978
Location: Proxima Centauri

a noun complement? #9 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 22:22 pm   a noun complement?
 

Thank you Gray.
1.So when writing an adjective before noun, it depends on first letter of an adjective which indefinte article (a,an) to use, right?
2. we can also put definite article ''the'' before an adjective + noun, right?
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1481

a noun complement? #10 (permalink) Sun Mar 15, 2009 7:28 am   a noun complement?
 

Saneta wrote:
Thank you Gray.
1.So when writing an adjective before noun, it depends on first letter of an adjective which indefinte article (a,an) to use, right?
2. we can also put definite article ''the'' before an adjective + noun, right?


1. True

2. True, as in --

"The whale is one of the most wonderful animals in the world" ~Charles Darwin.
_________________
First lesson - English, not english. I, not i. ~A student of English
Gray
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 978
Location: Proxima Centauri

Display posts from previous:   
Construction: Meaning of When it comes down to it | Hill-like?
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
Prepositions: Really good technique of making amends in certain areas of languageVerb: to have/having something"unconvenient" or "inconvenient"? Rules for 'un-'Sentence: If the price you are being asked to pay for..."stopped to cry" vs "stopped crying"wedding ceremony and receptionreading due to and but etc., + memorySentence: Tomorrow I'll take paper of English subject and Arabic on the day...Way to write in good structure or following any part of English grammarturn off and turn outParticiple functions (As An Adverb)According to vs with respect to vs referring to vs duo to vs regardingwhat's the word for the 'normal printed photos'

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail