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Difficult vs problem


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Difficult vs problem #1 (permalink) Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:28 am   Difficult vs problem
 

Test No. incompl/elem-20 "Where am I?", question 3

Well, my ......... is that I'm lost.

(a) problem
(b) situation
(c) hardship
(d) difficult

Test No. incompl/elem-20 "Where am I?", answer 3

Well, my problem is that I'm lost.

Correct answer: (a) problem

Your answer was: incorrect
Well, my difficult is that I'm lost.
_________________________

why this question cannot use difficult?

viviaan
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Difficult #2 (permalink) Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:38 am   Difficult
 

Hi Vivian,

The word you need in this sentence must be a noun. Difficult is an adjective and so you can't use it here. If you want to express another idea, you could say: My difficulty and that is the noun formed from the adjective difficult.

Alan
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Difficult vs problem #3 (permalink) Wed Aug 27, 2008 18:24 pm   Difficult vs problem
 

Hi,

Why "situation" is not correct?

Tks,
Cuoi
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Difficult vs problem #4 (permalink) Wed Aug 27, 2008 18:29 pm   Difficult vs problem
 

Because "situation" is rather neutral. It can refer to positive as well as negative circumstances. When you are lost, you are in trouble so you have a problem.

TOEIC short conversations: Giving a customer information about his bank accounts
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Difficult vs problem #5 (permalink) Fri Sep 12, 2008 21:18 pm   Difficult vs problem
 

Hi Alan
why hardship is not correct?
ali
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Difficult vs problem #6 (permalink) Fri Sep 12, 2008 22:29 pm   Difficult vs problem
 

Hi,

The speaker is lost and his problem is that he is lost. 'Hardship' refers to a long standing situation like being without money, living in poor conditions, not being able to work but in the test this is just one difficulty or one problem.

Alan
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Difficult vs problem #7 (permalink) Tue Oct 21, 2008 4:44 am   Difficult vs problem
 

Dear Sir ,
What exactly mean by I am lost
Satishchemeng
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Difficult vs problem #8 (permalink) Tue Oct 21, 2008 6:34 am   Difficult vs problem
 

Hello Satishchemeng, welcome to english-test.net and many thanks for your question. The phrase "I'm lost" means "I don't know what to do".
Keep up the great work!
Best regards,
Torsten

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Difficult vs problem #9 (permalink) Tue Oct 21, 2008 8:44 am   Difficult vs problem
 

Dear Torsten ,
Thank you very much for the reply
Can you please give some more examples where we can use " I am Lost " , In whic type of situations we can use etc.

Regards,

Satish
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Difficult vs problem #10 (permalink) Tue Jan 13, 2009 13:05 pm   Difficult vs problem
 

well, my problem is that I'm lost.
well, my dificult is that I'm lost.
i think first sentence is to be right according to the parts of speech because in the case we should use a noun to complete the sentence not to add or use an adjective.
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Difficult vs problem #11 (permalink) Tue Jan 13, 2009 16:19 pm   Difficult vs problem
 

"(Sorry) I am lost", you can use when you don't understand a situation or can't follow a conversation.

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Difficult vs problem #12 (permalink) Tue Jan 13, 2009 18:15 pm   Difficult vs problem
 

Hi,

What you need is the noun 'difficulty'.

Alan
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Difficult vs problem #13 (permalink) Wed Jan 14, 2009 4:30 am   Difficult vs problem
 

Torsten wrote:
Hello Satishchemeng, welcome to english-test.net and many thanks for your question. The phrase "I'm lost" means "I don't know what to do".
Keep up the great work!
Best regards,
Torsten


"I'm lost" indicates that you don't know where you are, whether it is geographically ("Can you show me where XX hotel is? I'm lost."), or in a conversation, as Belles1654 suggests, or perhaps when reading through some instructions.

For "I don't know what to do", "I'm at a loss" is more suitable.
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Difficult vs problem #14 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 6:20 am   Difficult vs problem
 

HI Mr. Alan
How are I sent to you many times but you did not reply me , I hope you reply.
Thanks
Sylla
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Difficult vs problem #15 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 6:24 am   Difficult vs problem
 

How are Mr. Alan?
I am very happy to meet but I sent to you many messages and did not reply , may be you don't know or you are so busy. Anyway I like you response me .
Thanks

The speaker is lost and his problem is that he is lost. 'Hardship' refers to a long standing situation like being without money, living in poor conditions, not being able to work but in the test this is just one difficulty or one problem.

Alan
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