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Difference between 'no more than' and 'not more than'



 
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ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Usage of rental: This rental agreement is made and executed on this day... | Sentence: I lost no time in writing to my friends.
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Difference between 'no more than' and 'not more than' #1 (permalink) Thu Jul 02, 2009 12:25 pm   Difference between 'no more than' and 'not more than'
 

Hello,

I'm a Japanese learner of English, and a newbie of this forum. Actually, I registered just a minute or two ago.

Anyhow, a friend of mine has been telling me that there's some difference between "no more than" and "not more than" in meaning, but others told me the other way around. Which is correct? I've got really confused. If somebody helps me out, it will be much appreciated.

For a starter, I've come up with a set of sentences in comparison.

1) In my opinion, fathers cannot love their children more than mothers do.

2a) In my opinion, fathers can no more love their children than mothers do.
2b) In my opinion, fathers can love their children no more than mothers do.
2c) In my opinion, fathers cannot love their children any more than mothers do.

Many thanks in advance.
Cheers.
Asian Member 101
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Joined: 02 Jul 2009
Posts: 2

Difference between 'no more than' and 'not more than' #2 (permalink) Thu Jul 02, 2009 13:21 pm   Difference between 'no more than' and 'not more than'
 

Hi Asian Member,

I would say that 'not more' is used with quantities that you can measure and 'no more' suggests 'not to a greater extent'.

I would say the clearest sentence is (1) .

The idea of 'no more' is used in this sort of context: She could no more lie than she could commit murder + This means that there is little chance of her lying.

'Not more' refers to quantity both literally and figuratively as in: They could not do more work that day because it was dark.

Alan
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Difference between 'no more than' and 'not more than' #3 (permalink) Thu Jul 02, 2009 13:44 pm   Difference between 'no more than' and 'not more than'
 

Hello Alan,

Thank you so much for your kindest reply. I really appreciate it.
Your comment is a great help.

I think I understand it, but if you don't mind, I would like to ask the same questions again.
Is there any difference in meaning between the sentences? I am wondering whether any
of them have a terrible interpretation like: Neither fathers nor mothers love their children.

I appreciate your help and patience.
Asian Member 101
New Member


Joined: 02 Jul 2009
Posts: 2

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Usage of rental: This rental agreement is made and executed on this day... | Sentence: I lost no time in writing to my friends.
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