Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
transgressor; person who breaks the law; one who insults
shortage
offender
capex
market
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Use of 'was' versus 'has been' (The lion has been let out of his cage)



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Adding 'self' | Easy way to learn grammar
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Use of 'was' versus 'has been' (The lion has been let out of his cage) #1 (permalink) Mon Jul 13, 2009 15:42 pm   Use of 'was' versus 'has been' (The lion has been let out of his cage)
 

Hi there - I've been curious about the difference in meaning (if any) of using "was" instead of "has been" in a sentence.

For example:

"The lion has been let out of his cage"

or

"The lion was let out of his cage"

Is there any difference in meaning? Is there a proper time to use one versus the other?

Thank you.
Atlswimguy
New Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 2

Use of "was" versus "has been" #2 (permalink) Mon Jul 13, 2009 22:04 pm   Use of "was" versus "has been"
 

Atlswimguy wrote:
Is there any difference in meaning?
In your context either one can be used.

Atlswimguy wrote:
Is there a proper time to use one versus the other?

Yes, there is.
1. The present perfect is used when the time period has NOT finished: I have seen three movies this week.
(This week has not finished yet.)
The simple past is used when the time period HAS finished: I saw three movies last week.

2. The present perfect is often used when giving recent news: Martin has crashed his car again.
(This is new information.)
The simple past is used when giving older information: Martin crashed his car last year.
(This is old information.)

3. The present perfect is used when the time is not specific: I have seen that movie already.
(We don't know when.)
The simple past is used when the time is clear: I saw that movie on Thursday.
(We know exactly when.)

4. The present perfect is used with for and since, when the actions have not finished yet: I have lived in Victoria for five years.
(I still live in Victoria.)
The simple past is used with for and since, when the actions have already finished: I lived in Victoria for five years.
(I don't live in Victoria now.)
_________________
conĚtext - The part of a text or statement that surrounds a particular word or passage and determines its meaning.
Milanya
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 29 Dec 2008
Posts: 923
Location: Texas, USA (at present)

Want to learn about the future tenses? Read this story and smileEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Start exploring the English language today! Subscribe to free email English course
Use of "was" versus "has been" #3 (permalink) Tue Jul 14, 2009 14:24 pm   Use of "was" versus "has been"
 

Thank you very much. Good explanation.
Atlswimguy
New Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 2

Display posts from previous:   
Adding 'self' | Easy way to learn grammar
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
Sentence: I would not have ask you if i knew it.feel as if vs. feel thatOther vs anotherlook vs sightshopping or for shoppingBeing happy means to have/having a lot of friends?Who are you expecting now? vs Whom are you expecting now?'metaphor' vs 'parable'Adjectives in verbs (She is older than me.)have or had (Have you seen anyone who was having a scabies?)"Does he" vs. "Does she"Meaning: make heads nor tails of this?Differences between maybe, perhaps and possible

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail