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Three Stages of life



 
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ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Usage of this side and at my end | would vs can haven't vs didn't
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Three Stages of life #1 (permalink) Sun Aug 02, 2009 13:59 pm   Three Stages of life
 

There are three stages of life:

Teen age: where you have time and energy, but there is no money.

Working age: where you have money and energy, but there is no time.

Old age: where you have time and money, but there is no energy.

Smartness is how to tackle the above.

With best regards
YNasser
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Three Stages of life #2 (permalink) Sun Aug 02, 2009 21:08 pm   Three Stages of life
 

Shakespeare thought there were seven stages.

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

William Shakespeare - All the world's a stage (from As You Like It 2/7)
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Three Stages of life #3 (permalink) Sun Aug 02, 2009 23:07 pm   Three Stages of life
 

there are a fourth stage
the childhood age which you have no money no time no energy
:)
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Usage of this side and at my end | would vs can haven't vs didn't
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