Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to indicate; to itemize; to mark; to designate; to stipulate
mend
crop
verify
specify
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many sheep



 
ESL/EFL Worksheets and Handouts for Students Printable, photocopiable, clearly structured
Designed for teachers and individual learners
For use in a classroom, at home, on your PC
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
the preposition 'in' | What is the 'best title?'
listening exercisestell a friend
Message
Author
Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many sheep #1 (permalink) Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:12 pm   Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many sheep
 

Hi Alan,

Grammar question:-

How do we explain singular and plural nouns?

Eg.
Singular Plural
A girl Many girls

A boy Many boys

A sheep Many sheep

Singular for sheep is sheep while plural for sheep is also sheep.

My students asked me for an explanation.

How do I explain to them? Do I say exceptional case?

Thank you.

Regards,
Lee
Laimeai2006
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 07 Aug 2008
Posts: 44

Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many sheep #2 (permalink) Thu Aug 13, 2009 14:50 pm   Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many sheep
 

Hi,

Some words don't change in the plural and 'sheep' is one of them. The explanation is that it is an exception. They are called 'zero' plurals - aircraft/fish/pheasant/deer/giraffe. As you can see from the last 4, they are often collections of animals.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16542
Location: UK

Can you find all the prepositions in this story?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!How many different ways with words do you know? Subscribe to free email English course
Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many s #3 (permalink) Thu Aug 13, 2009 21:14 pm   Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many s
 

Alan wrote:
Hi,

Some words don't change in the plural and 'sheep' is one of them. The explanation is that it is an exception. They are called 'zero' plurals - aircraft/fish/pheasant/deer/giraffe. As you can see from the last 4, they are often collections of animals.

Alan


Pheasant and giraffe can be made plural, though, or at least they are in AmE.

I live in prime pheasant hunting country, where people come from all across the US to hunt pheasants. I personally have killed many pheasants, both with my gun, and unfortunately, the grill or windshield of my car.

Giraffes, however, are much rarer, and nobody hunts them here.
_________________
Plan to be spontaneous tomorrow.
***
Did you hear they arrested the Energizer Bunny on battery charges?
***
Skrej
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 03 Jul 2008
Posts: 863
Location: Not-quite exact central USA

Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many sheep #4 (permalink) Thu Aug 13, 2009 22:54 pm   Singular vs. plural: A girl - Many girls, A boy - Many boys, A sheep - Many sheep
 

Hi,

Of course you can add an 's' to 'giraffe' and 'pheasant' if you want - you don't have to be American.

Alan
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 16542
Location: UK

Display posts from previous:   
the preposition 'in' | What is the 'best title?'
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
"The inspiration is all you" -- correct?Usage of Logic and ConfusionPrepositional Usagethe children played vs the children were playingMeaning of "on the spot"take a trip vs. make a tripHelp to prepare the dinner for them. vs Help to prepare the dinner for themin vs. at (I work in the airport. vs I work at the airport.)spectacles vs. glassesMeaning of "husband brand"Sentence: I told her that dad wanted me to give her the keys which I have to...What does "sweep out" mean?much time vs more time

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Subscribe to FREE email English course
First name E-mail