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appointment; proposal of a candidate (for an office or an honor)
nomination
central
due
development
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Idiom: 'have one's nose in a book'



 
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Idiom: 'have one's nose in a book' #1 (permalink) Sat Sep 10, 2005 22:40 pm   Idiom: 'have one's nose in a book'
 

Test No. express/inter-4 "Picking you up", question 6

He's always got his nose in a book.

(a) hiding
(b) reading
(c) studying
(d) looking

Test No. express/inter-4 "Picking you up", answer 6

He's always reading.

Correct answer: (b) reading
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i want an explanation for this one and the usage and meaning
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Idiom: 'have one's nose in a book' #2 (permalink) Sun Sep 11, 2005 12:19 pm   Idiom: 'have one's nose in a book'
 

.
The idiomatic phrase to have one's nose in a book means to be closely reading the book.
.

There is at least one other lexically-related idiom: to have one's nose in another's business / affairs /etc means to be inappropriately preoccupied with another's business, etc.
.
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Idiom: 'have one's nose in a book' #3 (permalink) Sun Sep 11, 2005 13:11 pm   Idiom: 'have one's nose in a book'
 

Hi,

Have your nose in a book is often used to describe someone who is always reading and at the same time is absorbed in the activity. You might like to look at another exercise I've done on idioms using other parts of the body:

Expressions, Intermediate Level # 1

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