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to express a preconceived opinion; to express one's biases
acquaint
discuss
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prejudice
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Expression "Full infinitive to"



 
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Expression "Full infinitive to" #1 (permalink) Thu Sep 17, 2009 15:12 pm   Expression "Full infinitive to"
 

Ok...Hi there!
When I say, "They don't know how to dance", I'm sure that the infinitive with how is ok. But I haven't been able to come up with the usage for the inifnitve with who in a sentence.

I don't know if this is o.k. "I haven't decided who to invite to the party" Even so, is it common to use the full infinitive after the WH-question who? Because for me it's much better to say, "I haven't decided who I should invite to the party"

Thanks in advance...
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Full infinitive to #2 (permalink) Thu Sep 17, 2009 15:14 pm   Full infinitive to
 

Both are correct!
The difference is the added word "should".
- In "who to invite to the party", there is some sense of obligation contained in the infinitive. This is the same sense as is conveyed by "should" in "who I should invite to the party".

Infinitives with "to" may have different shades of meaning in them, depending on context.
- I want to dance. (No extra shade of meaning.)
- I don't know what to do. (Equivalent of "...what I should do": extra sense of obligation or "what it is best to do". I think this applies to all indirect questions.)
- Did you find any enemies to kill? (Equivalent of "...that could be killed": extra sense of possibility, potentiality. The sense of the infinitive is also arguably passive here: the enemies are the ones that could be killed, not the ones that could kill. I think this shade of meaning comes to all infinitives that are attached as appositions to nouns or adjectives.)
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Expression "Full infinitive to" #3 (permalink) Thu Sep 17, 2009 22:16 pm   Expression "Full infinitive to"
 

hey Cerberus...thanks for such a smooth explanation!
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Sergio M.
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