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Ms, Mrs, Miss?


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Which is the correct preposition? | Form is even less separable from content in poetry than body is from soul, and wh
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #1 (permalink) Sun Oct 02, 2005 11:51 am   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

Hi, could anybody explain the differences between these abbreviations, please:

Ms
Mrs
Miss

I always confuse them and please also tell me if those abbreviations are used differently in North America and Europe and Australia.
Thanks in advance
Marina
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #2 (permalink) Sun Oct 02, 2005 14:25 pm   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

They are used the same in all English-speaking countries, Marina.

Ms -- a married or unmarried woman
Mrs -- a married woman
Miss -- an unmarried woman

Ms is used out of courtesy when we do not know the marital status of the woman, or if she prefers the title.
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Ms vs. miss #3 (permalink) Mon Oct 03, 2005 11:13 am   Ms vs. miss
 

Hello MM,

Thank you for your reply. I appreciate your help. Could you please also tell me whether there is a difference in pronunciation between Ms and Miss?
Regards
Marina
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #4 (permalink) Mon Oct 03, 2005 13:14 pm   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

.
Yes, there is, Marina, and it is usually strongly enunciated because of the social importance of distinguishing:

Ms = /miz/
Miss = /mis/

.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #5 (permalink) Tue Oct 11, 2005 8:06 am   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

Also I know in some parts of the United States, you only say Ms if the lady is divorced.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #6 (permalink) Tue Oct 11, 2005 9:13 am   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

.
Quote:
you only say Ms if the lady is divorced.


I am unaware of that fact, Cooliegirly. What part of the United States does that hold true for?
.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #7 (permalink) Wed Oct 12, 2005 9:04 am   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

Oregon, Mr Micawber.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #8 (permalink) Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:29 am   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

.
I'm afraid that that is not generally understood even in Oregon, CG; I just received a response from my 'Oregon connection' (an Oregonian friend), who has this to say:

"The title Ms exists only to avoid the arcane labels implied by Miss and Mrs. It may be used by any woman who cares to mask her marital status and concentrate on who she is as a person. It does, however, tend to carry its own implications (like feminist ball-busting b****). Those are the breaks, right?"

I hasten to add that those are her words, not mine.
.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #9 (permalink) Thu Jan 10, 2008 21:17 pm   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

Hi Charles,

I think it's important to point out that "Ms" is a rather artificial construction that might have been invented by a group of feminists who wanted to create some type of linguistic equality. However, to me using "Ms" is rather confusing because it's used in written English only so there is no difference in pronunciation between "Ms" and "Miss" simply because "Ms" is never pronounced. At least, that's how I understand it. Also, why have three different titles for women if there is just one for men? If you address a woman with "Ms" she might actually be more offended than if you would have used "Mrs" because you are implying that she might not be married.

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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #10 (permalink) Thu Jan 10, 2008 23:08 pm   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

.
Dear me, Torsten-- a bit male-chauvinistic, are you? The words are pronounced differently ( /mis/ vs /miz/). And I suggest that you do a poll regarding what would offend women, rather than assuming it. I believe that we should allow women to decide how they should be titled-- and they have done so by adding Ms to our vocabulary.
.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #11 (permalink) Fri Jan 11, 2008 5:00 am   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

I know why this topic has got tons of views, cos it's so fundamental for everyday use.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #12 (permalink) Fri Jan 11, 2008 15:23 pm   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

Hi Storm,

Why do think using "Mrs", "Ms" and "Miss" is fundamental? How often do you address people using those titles?

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Fundamental? #13 (permalink) Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:57 am   Fundamental?
 

Why so fundamental, sorry maybe for the application in an English speaking work environment where hospitality language is spoken to guests or customers. A thought of a Thai English teacher to Thai EFL students. I didn't see it in the shoes of a Native speaker.
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Ms, Mrs, Miss? #14 (permalink) Mon Jan 14, 2008 13:50 pm   Ms, Mrs, Miss?
 

Hi Storm,

Wouldn't you agree that it is very difficult to distinguish between "Miss" and Ms" in spoken English? As far as I understand, "Ms" is used in written English anyway. Also, how do you define "hospitality language"? Maybe you can give me some examples where you would use "Ms" and "Miss" so I get a better idea of what you mean.

Thanks,
Torsten

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doubt #15 (permalink) Wed Jan 28, 2009 5:00 am   doubt
 

Difference between Mrs. and Ms.
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