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effective vs. effectual



 
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effective vs. effectual #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 09, 2009 6:54 am   effective vs. effectual
 

Hello,

This ticket remains ____ for three months.

(A) effective (B) effectual

Which one is right for the blank? I think (A) is usually used but (B) could be an answer. It is a little bit formal word for 'effective', isn't it? What do you think?

Thanks,
sweetpumpkin
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effective vs. effectual #2 (permalink) Mon Nov 09, 2009 12:33 pm   effective vs. effectual
 

Only A is possible.
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effective vs. effectual #3 (permalink) Mon Nov 09, 2009 14:43 pm   effective vs. effectual
 

Oh, my book says the answer goes to A. But I don't know why. Would you tell me why (B) is not suitable for the blank?

Thanks,
sweetpumpkin
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effective vs. effectual #4 (permalink) Mon Nov 09, 2009 14:55 pm   effective vs. effectual
 

It is not used in that way; it is used with the meaning 'producing or capable of producing an intended effect; adequate.'
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effective vs. effectual #5 (permalink) Mon Nov 09, 2009 14:59 pm   effective vs. effectual
 

Hi SP,

'Effective' is as stated above the only possible choice for your sentence because it suggests something is in force. Often it means creating a good effect as in: The colour on the walls is very effective because it shows up the real colour of the furniture.

'Effectual' suggests producing the result you want as in: The new law about reducing excessive noise is effectual because the streets are much quieter now.

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effective vs. effectual #6 (permalink) Mon Nov 09, 2009 17:45 pm   effective vs. effectual
 

Interesting question.

The problem is that the word 'effectual' can mean 'legally binding' or 'in force', too. I remember that because I was once looking for a word or expression that would fit this context. However, it must be so infrequently used in this sense that this meaning is not even hinted at in most monolingual learner's dictionaries. I found it only in the OED and, I think, some other dictionary. Here's what the OED says:

"That produces its intended effect, or adequately answers its purpose. Of legal documents or covenants: Valid, binding."

I just ran a quick Google search and found a few examples:

"And all contracts made according to the provisions herein contained shall be effectual in law and shall be binding upon the body corporate and its successors and all other parties thereto, their heirs, executors, or administrators as the case may be."

"Any contract so made shall be effectual in law and shall bind the company and its successors and all other parties thereto and may be varied or discharged in the manner in which it is authorized to be made."

"No dealing, until registered in the manner provided by this Act, shall be effectual to pass any estate or interest in any land under the provisions of this Act, or to render such land liable as security for the payment of money, but upon the registration of any dealing in the manner provided by this Act, the estate or interest specified in such dealing shall pass, or as the case may be the land shall become liable as security in manner and subject to the covenants, conditions, and contingencies set forth and specified in such dealing, or by this Act declared to be implied in instruments of a like nature."

"No conveyance, transfer, or mortgage of real property, or of any interest therein, nor any lease for a term of 1 year or longer, shall be good and effectual in law or equity against creditors or subsequent purchasers for a valuable consideration and without notice, unless the same be recorded according to law; nor shall any such instrument made or executed by virtue of any power of attorney be good or effectual in law or in equity against creditors or subsequent purchasers for a valuable consideration and without notice unless the power of attorney be recorded before the accruing of the right of such creditor or subsequent purchaser."

This is not to imply, of course, that (B) can be chosen as a correct answer here. Just a side note.
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effective vs. effectual #7 (permalink) Tue Nov 10, 2009 1:28 am   effective vs. effectual
 

Thank you for your attention. I've just read the answers carefully. I think the question is not really good; it can cause a lot of controversy. Of course the answer is 'effective' but I think there's still a tiny room for an EFL learner to think 'effectual' is a possible answer because the authoritative dictionary(OED) says so even though in real life it is not used in that way. Anyway, I got that effective is the right answer. Thank you again. I learned a precious piece of information again here. :)
Sweetpumpkin
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Posts: 497
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